Thurston Hall

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Thurston Hall
We Have Our Moments (1937) 1.jpg
Hall (right) in We Have Our Moments (1937)
Born
Ernest Thurston Hall

(1882-05-10)May 10, 1882
DiedFebruary 20, 1958(1958-02-20) (aged 75)
OccupationActor
Years active1915–1957
Spouse(s)Quenda Hackett
(m. 19??; his death 1958)

Ernest Thurston Hall (May 10, 1882 February 20, 1958) was an American film, stage and television actor.

Contents

Personal life

Hall was born in Boston, Massachusetts. [1] Hall was married to Quenda Hackett (1897–1984) [2] at the time of his death. [3]

Stage

Hall toured with various New England stage companies during his teens, then went onto London, where he formed a small stage troupe. He also toured New Zealand and South Africa." [4]

At 22 in 1904, Hall was in the first stage production of Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch . His Broadway credits include The Only Girl (1914), Have a Heart (1917), Civilian Clothes (1919), The French Doll (1922), Still Waters (1926), Buy, Buy, Baby (1926), Mixed Doubles (1927), Behold the Bridegroom (1927), The Common Sin (1928), Sign of the Leopard (1928), Security (1929), Fifty Million Frenchmen (1929), Everything's Jake (1930), Philip Goes Forth (1931), Chrysalis (1932), Thoroughbred (1933), Re-echo (1934), They Shall Not Die (1934), Spring Freshet (1934), All Rights Reserved (1934), and Rain from Heaven (1934). [5]

In 1925, Hall took a troupe to Australia to perform the play So This Is London . [6]

Film and television

Hall's film career began with his work in silent films in 1915. [7] He appeared in 250 films between 1915 and 1957 and is remembered for his portrayal, during the later stages of his career, of often pompous or blustering authority figures. Early in his silent career, he supported Theda Bara in her vamp-costume dramas.

Hall's best-known television role was as Mr. Schuyler, the boss of Cosmo Topper (played by Leo G. Carroll), in the 1950s television series, Topper (1953–1956). [1]

Filmography

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References

  1. 1 2 Aylesworth, Thomas G. and Bowman, John S. (1987). The World Almanac Who's Who of Film. World Almanac. ISBN   0-88687-308-8. Pp. 186-187.
  2. Quenda Hall; findagrave.com
  3. "Actor Thurston Hall Dies in California". Reading Eagle . Associated Press. February 21, 1958. p. 22. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  4. Katz, Ephraim (1979). The Film Encyclopedia: The Most Comprehensive Encyclopedia of World Cinema in a Single Volume. Perigee Books. ISBN   0-399-50601-2. P. 526.
  5. "Thurston Hall". Playbill Vault. Retrieved May 30, 2016.
  6. "Thurston Hall". The Age. Australia, Melbourne. February 9, 1925. p. 12. Retrieved May 29, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  7. "Thurston Hall, 75, Dies; Veteran Character Actor". Independent. California, Long Beach. Associated Press. February 21, 1958. p. 31. Retrieved May 29, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg