Thurton

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Thurton
St Ethelbert, Thurton, Norfolk - geograph.org.uk - 1281043.jpg
St Ethelbert, Thurton
Norfolk UK location map.svg
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Thurton
Location within Norfolk
Area3.18 km2 (1.23 sq mi)
Population567 (2011)
  Density 178/km2 (460/sq mi)
OS grid reference TG327010
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NORWICH
Postcode district NR14
Dialling code 01508
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk
52°33′25″N1°26′06″E / 52.557°N 1.435°E / 52.557; 1.435 Coordinates: 52°33′25″N1°26′06″E / 52.557°N 1.435°E / 52.557; 1.435

The village should not be confused with Thurlton which is 6 miles (9½ km) to the east.

Thurlton village in the United Kingdom

The village should not be confused with Thurton which is 6 miles to the west.

Thurton is a village in South Norfolk lying 8½ miles (13½ km) south-east of Norwich on the A146 Norwich to Lowestoft road between Framingham Pigot and Loddon. The A146 effectively divides the village in two; a 40 mph limit is in force.[ citation needed ] At the 2001 census and the 2011 Census Thurton had 223 households and a population of 567. [1]

South Norfolk District in England

South Norfolk is a local government district in Norfolk, England. Its council is based in Long Stratton. The population of the Local Authority District was 124,012 as taken at the 2011 Census.

Norwich City and non-metropolitan district in England

Norwich is a city in Norfolk, England. Granted historic city status, and situated on the River Wensum in East Anglia, it lies approximately 100 miles (160 km) north-east of London. It is the county town of Norfolk and is considered the capital of East Anglia, with a population of 141,300. From the Middle Ages until the Industrial Revolution, Norwich was the largest city in England after London, and one of the most important.

A146 road An A road in East Anglia, England

The A146 is an A road that connects Norwich in Norfolk and Lowestoft in Suffolk, two of East Anglia's largest population centres. It is around 27 miles (43 km) in length and has primary classification along its entire route. It is mainly single carriageway throughout its route, with the exception of a section of dual carriageway on the southern edge of Norwich.

Thurton is written 'Tortuna' in the Domesday Book. The suffix is the Anglo-Saxon 'tun', meaning an enclosed space. The prefix may refer to a thorn bush, or perhaps to the Anglo-Saxon god Thunor, whom the Normans called Thur. So Thurton may mean 'the place of the thorn bush' or 'Thor's enclosure'.

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

The village no longer has a shop, post office or garage, all having closed. It has a pub, the George and Dragon which has darts and pool teams and sponsors the football team. It also provides the focus for the village's annual St George's Day celebrations and is often host to local bands. Opposite the pub is Thurton Foundry which was founded in 1963 and produces ferrous and non-ferrous castings. The village hosts a large classic car show and autojumble annually which raises significant money for local charities.

The thatched parish church stands on a hill to the south of the village and is dedicated to St Ethelbert. Parts date from the Norman period. [2] Thurton Primary School has around 90 children between the ages of 4-11. [3]

Æthelberht II of East Anglia Saint and king of East Anglia

Æthelberht, also called Saint Ethelbert the King, was an eighth-century saint and a king of East Anglia, the Anglo-Saxon kingdom which today includes the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. Little is known of his reign, which may have begun in 779, according to later sources, and very few of the coins issued during his reign have been discovered. It is known from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle that he was killed on the orders of Offa of Mercia in 794.

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References

  1. Thurton parish information Archived 2007-11-07 at the Wayback Machine South Norfolk Council. Retrieved 2010-12-19.
  2. St Ethelbert, Thurton Norfolk Churches. Retrieved 2010-12-19
  3. Thurton Primary School profile Norfolk County Council. Retrieved 2010-12-19.