Thyer Glacier

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Tyer Glacier
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
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Location of Tyer Glacier in Antarctica
Typetributary
Location Enderby Land
Coordinates 67°43′S48°45′E / 67.717°S 48.750°E / -67.717; 48.750
Thicknessunknown
Terminus Rayner Glacier
Statusunknown

Thyer Glacier ( 67°43′S48°45′E / 67.717°S 48.750°E / -67.717; 48.750 Coordinates: 67°43′S48°45′E / 67.717°S 48.750°E / -67.717; 48.750 ) is a tributary glacier, flowing northwest along the south side of the Raggatt Mountains to enter the Rayner Glacier. Mapped from ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) air photos taken by the RAAF flight in 1956. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for R.F. Thyer, chief geophysicist, Bureau of Mineral Resources, Australian Department of National Development and Energy.

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