Thyia of Thessaly

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In Greek mythology, Thyia ( /ˈθə/ ; Ancient Greek : ΘυίαThuia derived from the verb θύω "to sacrifice") was the daughter of Deucalion and Pyrrha and mother of Magnes and Makednos (the claimed ancestor of the Macedonians) by Zeus, according to a quotation from Hesiod's lost work the Catalogue of Women , preserved in the De Thematibus of Constantine Porphyrogenitus and in Stephanus of Byzantium's Ethnika. [1] [2] [3]

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References

  1. Constantine Porphyrogenitus, De Thematibus, 2 (p. 86 sq. Pertusi)
  2. Hesiod. Fragments, 26
  3. Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Makedonia