Thyreobaeus

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Thyreobaeus
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Linyphiidae
Genus: Thyreobaeus
Simon, 1889 [1]
Species:
T. scutiger
Binomial name
Thyreobaeus scutiger
Simon, 1889

Thyreobaeus is a monotypic genus of East African sheet weavers containing the single species, Thyreobaeus scutiger. It was first described by Eugène Louis Simon in 1889, [2] and has only been found on Madagascar. [1]

Monotypic taxon taxonomic group which contains only one immediately subordinate taxon (according to the referenced point of view)

In biology, a monotypic taxon is a taxonomic group (taxon) that contains only one immediately subordinate taxon.

A genus is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.

Linyphiidae Family of spiders

Linyphiidae is a family of very small spiders, including more than 4,300 described species in 601 genera worldwide. This makes Linyphiidae the second largest family of spiders after the Salticidae. New species are still being discovered throughout the world, and the family is poorly known. Because of the difficulty in identifying such tiny spiders, there are regular changes in taxonomy as species are combined or divided.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Gen. Thyreobaeus Simon, 1889". World Spider Catalog Version 20.0. Natural History Museum Bern. 2019. doi:10.24436/2 . Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  2. Simon, E. (1889). "Etudes arachnologiques. 21e Mémoire. XXXI. Descriptions d'espèces et the genres nouveaux de Madagascar et de Mayotte". Annales de la Société Entomologique de France. 8 (6): 223–236.