Thyreosthenius

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Thyreosthenius
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Linyphiidae
Genus: Thyreosthenius
Simon, 1884 [1]
Type species
T. biovatus
Species
Synonyms [1]
  • HormathionCrosby & Bishop, 1933 [2]

Thyreosthenius is a genus of sheet weavers that was first described by Eugène Louis Simon in 1884. [3] As of May 2019 it contains only two species, both found in Europe, North America, Russia, East Asia, and the Caucasus: T. biovatus and T. parasiticus . [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Gen. Thyreosthenius Simon, 1884". World Spider Catalog Version 20.0. Natural History Museum Bern. 2019. doi:10.24436/2 . Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  2. Hackman, W. (1952). "Contributions to the knowledge of Finnish spiders". Memoranda Societatis pro Fauna et Flora Fennica. 27: 73.
  3. Simon, E. (1884). Les arachnides de France. Tome cinquième, deuxième et troisième partie. Roret, Paris. pp. 180–885.