Thyrsitops lepidopoides

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Thyrsitops lepidopoides
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Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Scombriformes
Family: Gempylidae
Genus: Thyrsitops
T. N. Gill, 1862
Species:
T. lepidopoides
Binomial name
Thyrsitops lepidopoides
(G. Cuvier, 1832)
Synonyms
  • Thyrsites lepidopoidesG. Cuvier, 1832

Thyrsitops lepidopoides, the white snake mackerel, is a species of snake mackerel found off the coasts of South America from Brazil on the Atlantic side to Chile on the Pacific side. It can be found at depths of from 30 to 350 metres (98 to 1,148 ft). This species can reach a length of 40 centimetres (16 in) SL though most do not exceed 25 centimetres (9.8 in) SL. It is of minor importance to local commercial fisheries. It is currently the only known member of its genus. [1]

Gempylidae family of fishes

The Gempylidae are a family of perciform fishes, commonly known as snake mackerels or escolars. The family includes about 25 species.

South America A continent in the Western Hemisphere, and mostly in the Southern Hemisphere

South America is a continent in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere. It may also be considered a subcontinent of the Americas, which is how it is viewed in the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking regions of the Americas. The reference to South America instead of other regions has increased in the last decades due to changing geopolitical dynamics.

Brazil Federal republic in South America

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers and with over 208 million people, Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country by area and the fifth most populous. Its capital is Brasília, and its most populated city is São Paulo. The federation is composed of the union of the 26 states, the Federal District, and the 5,570 municipalities. It is the largest country to have Portuguese as an official language and the only one in the Americas; it is also one of the most multicultural and ethnically diverse nations, due to over a century of mass immigration from around the world.

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<i>Promethichthys prometheus</i> species of fish

Promethichthys prometheus, the Roudi escolar, is a species of snake mackerel native to the warm temperate and tropical waters of all the oceans where it occurs at depths of from 80 to 800 metres. This species grows to a length of 100 centimetres (39 in) SL though most do not exceed 40 centimetres (16 in) SL. It is important to local peoples as a food fish and is popular as a game fish though it has been reported to carry the ciguatera toxin. It is also utilized as bait. This species is the only known member of its genus.

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Tongaichthys robustus, the Tonga escolar, is a species of snake mackerel known from the Tonga Ridge near Fiji and off of Queensland, Australia from Flinders Reef. It is known to occur at depths of from 288 to 312 metres. This species grows to a length of 30 centimetres (12 in) SL. This species is the only known member of its genus.

Eutaeniichthys gilli is a species of goby native to brackish waters of the northwestern Pacific Ocean from around Japan, the Korean Peninsula and the Yellow Sea. It is an inhabitant of estuarine tide pools where it can be found under rocks. This species grows to a length of 4 centimetres (1.6 in) SL. This species is the only known member of its genus. The generic name is a compound of eu meaning "good", taenia meaning "ribbon" or "tape", Eutaenia being a synonym of the garter snake genus Thamnophis, and ichthys, "fish". The specific name honours the American ichthyologist Theodore Gill (1837-1914) for his work on the gobies of Japan.

The Blackspot minigoby is a species of goby native to the eastern Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean from Australia to Japan to the Tuamotus and French Polynesia where it can be found inhabiting reefs at depths of from 3 to 38 metres. Males of this species grow to a length of 1.3 centimetres (0.51 in) SL while females can reach a length of 1.5 centimetres (0.59 in) SL. This species is the only known member of its genus.

References

  1. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Thyrsitops lepidopoides" in FishBase . April 2013 version.