Thysanothecium

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Thysanothecium
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Ascomycota
Class: Lecanoromycetes
Order: Lecanorales
Family: Cladoniaceae
Genus: Thysanothecium
Mont. & Berk. (1846)
Type species
Thysanothecium hookeri
Mont. & Berk. (1846)
Species

T. hookeri
T. scutellatum
T. sorediatum

Thysanothecium is a genus of three species of lichenized fungi in the family Cladoniaceae. [1] The genus was circumscribed by Camille Montagne and Miles Joseph Berkeley in 1846. The original specimens of the type species, T. hookeri , were collected from the area of Swan River (Australia) by James Drummond, who sent them for to William Jackson Hooker for further analysis. [2]

Related Research Articles

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<i>Mastodia</i> Genus of lichens

Mastodia is a genus of lichen-forming fungi in the family Verrucariaceae. It has six species. The genus was circumscribed in 1847 by Joseph Dalton Hooker and William Henry Harvey. The type species, Mastodia tessellata, is a bipolar, coastal lichen. It forms a symbiotic association with the macroscopic genus Prasiola; this is the only known lichen symbiosis involving a foliose green alga. Studies suggest that throughout its geographic range, the lichen comprises two fungal species and three algal lineages that associate.

References

  1. Wijayawardene, Nalin; Hyde, Kevin; Al-Ani, LKT; Dolatabadi, S; Stadler, Marc; Haelewaters, Danny; et al. (2020). "Outline of Fungi and fungus-like taxa". Mycosphere. 11: 1060–1456. doi: 10.5943/mycosphere/11/1/8 .
  2. Montagne, C.; Berkeley, M.J. (1846). "On Thysanothecium, a new genus of lichens". Hooker's Journal of Botany. 5: 257–258.