Tiadaghton State Forest

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Tiadaghton State Forest
Pennsylvania State Forest
White Deer Hole Creek near 4th Gap.JPG
Tiadaghton State Forest: White Deer Hole Creek near the Fourth Gap of South White Deer Ridge, Washington Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania
Named for:Tiadaghton, an Iroquois name for Pine Creek
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
Counties Clinton, Lycoming, Potter, Tioga, Union
Elevation1,493 ft (455.1 m)
Coordinates 41°09′40″N77°02′21″W / 41.16111°N 77.03917°W / 41.16111; -77.03917 Coordinates: 41°09′40″N77°02′21″W / 41.16111°N 77.03917°W / 41.16111; -77.03917
Area215,500 acres (87,210 ha)
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Tiadaghton State Forest
USA Pennsylvania location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location of Tiadaghton State Forest's headquarters in Pennsylvania
Website: Tiadaghton State Forest

Tiadaghton State Forest is a Pennsylvania State Forest in the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #12. The forest is chiefly in western and southern Lycoming County, with small portions in Clinton, Potter, Tioga, and Union Counties.

Lycoming County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Lycoming County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 116,111. Its county seat is Williamsport.

Clinton County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Clinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 39,238. Its county seat is Lock Haven. The county was created on June 21, 1839, from parts of Centre and Lycoming Counties. Its name is in honor of the seventh Governor of New York State, DeWitt Clinton, however some sources suggest the namesake is Henry Clinton.

Potter County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Potter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,457, making it the fifth-least populous county in Pennsylvania. Its county seat is Coudersport. The county was created in 1804 and later organized in 1836. It is named after James Potter, who was a general from Pennsylvania in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Though it is named for him, James Potter never actually lived in Potter County and may have never even visited the area.

Contents

As of July 1, 2005 the state forest lands in eastern Lycoming County, which had been part of Tiadaghton State Forest, became part of the new Loyalsock State Forest. The main office for district #12 is in South Williamsport, in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in the United States. There are plans to move it to the Pine Creek valley, perhaps to the village of Waterville. Tiadaghton is the Iroquois name for Pine Creek, but its meaning is unknown.

Loyalsock State Forest

Loyalsock State Forest is a Pennsylvania state forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #20. The forest spans across the northern tier's "Endless Mountains" and is a total of 114,552 acres (46,358 ha). The Loyalsock is a “working forest” and is managed for pure water, recreation, plant and animal habitats, sustainable timber, and natural gas.

South Williamsport, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania

South Williamsport is a borough in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is famous for hosting the Little League World Series. The population was 6,412 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Williamsport, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

History

As the timber was exhausted and the land burned, many companies simply abandoned their holdings. [1] Conservationists like Dr. Joseph Rothrock became concerned that the forests would not regrow if they were not managed properly. They called for the state to purchase land from the lumber companies and for a change in the philosophy of forest management. In 1895 Rothrock was appointed the first commissioner of the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, the forerunner of today's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. In 1897 the Pennsylvania General Assembly passed legislation which authorized the purchase of "unseated lands for forest reservations" and the first Pennsylvania state forest lands were acquired the following year. [2]

Joseph Rothrock American conservationist

Joseph Trimble Rothrock was an American environmentalist, recognized as the "Father of Forestry" in Pennsylvania. In 1895, Rothrock was appointed the first forestry commissioner to lead the newly formed Division of Forestry in the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. Two of his major accomplishments as commissioner were his land acquisition program and the creation of a forest academy to train foresters for state service.

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), established on July 1, 1995, is the agency in the U.S. State of Pennsylvania responsible for maintaining and preserving the state's 121 state parks and 20 state forests; providing information on the state's natural resources; and working with communities to benefit local recreation and natural areas. The agency has its headquarters in the Rachel Carson State Office Building in Harrisburg.

On July 13, 1898, the state bought a 409-acre (166 ha) tract of land in Cummings Township for $72.99 ($2147 in 2018 terms). [3] This was the first purchase for what became Tiadaghton State Forest, which surrounds the park. The state forest grew to 66,000 acres (27,000 ha) by 1908, and over 160,000 acres (65,000 ha) in 1933. [4] Most of the major purchases for it were made between 1900 and 1935. [5]

2005 Realignment

Prior to the July 1, 2005 realignment of Pennsylvania State Forest Districts, Tiadaghton State Forest included all state forest lands in Lycoming County and encompassed 215,500 acres (87,210 ha). After realignment, the state forest tracts in eastern Lycoming County became part of the new Loyalsock State Forest. The District #12 office will also move from South Williamsport to Waterville, at the confluence of Little Pine Creek and Pine Creek, where the largest part of the forest is now located. The southern tracts are along Bald Eagle Mountain, North White Deer Ridge, South White Deer Ridge, and the White Deer Hole Creek watershed.

Bald Eagle Mountain mountain in central Pennsylvania, USA

Bald Eagle Mountain – once known locally as Muncy Mountain – is a stratigraphic ridge in the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians of central Pennsylvania, USA, running east of the Allegheny Front and northwest of Mount Nittany. It lies along the southeast side of Bald Eagle Creek, and south of the West Branch Susquehanna River, and is the westernmost ridge in its section of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians. The ridge line separates the West Branch Susquehanna Valley from the Nippenose and White Deer Hole Valleys, and Bald Eagle Valley from Nittany Valley.

White Deer Hole Creek tributary of the West Branch Susquehanna River

White Deer Hole Creek is a 20.5-mile (33.0 km) tributary of the West Branch Susquehanna River in Clinton, Lycoming and Union counties in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. A part of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin, the White Deer Hole Creek watershed drains parts of ten townships. The creek flows east in a valley of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, through sandstone, limestone, and shale from the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian periods.

As of 2009, the Tiadaghton State Forest covered 146,500 acres (59,300 ha), chiefly in Lycoming County with small tracts in Clinton, Potter, Tioga, and Union Counties. The largest section of the state forest consists of 105,000 acres (42,000 ha) in the Pine Creek valley. [5]

Tioga County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Tioga County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,981. Its county seat is Wellsboro. The county was created on March 26, 1804, from part of Lycoming County and later organized in 1812. It is named for the Tioga River.

Union County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Union County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 44,947. Its county seat is Lewisburg. The county was created on March 22, 1813, from part of Northumberland County. Its name is an allusion to the federal Union.

Other attractions

Hiking

Natural areas

The southern tract of Tiadaghton State Forest runs along White South Deer Ridge White Deer Hole Valley crop.JPG
The southern tract of Tiadaghton State Forest runs along White South Deer Ridge

Wild Areas

Nearby state parks

Neighboring state forest districts

Related Research Articles

Rothrock State Forest

Rothrock State Forest is a Pennsylvania state forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #5. The main offices are located in Huntingdon in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Bald Eagle State Forest

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Susquehannock State Forest

Susquehannock State Forest is a Pennsylvania state forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #15. The main office is located in Coudersport in Potter County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Forbes State Forest

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Tioga State Forest

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Wyoming State Forest

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Pinchot State Forest

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Weiser State Forest

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Little Pine State Park

Little Pine State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 2,158 acres (873 ha) in Cummings Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in the United States. Little Pine State park is along 4.2 miles (6.8 km) of Little Pine Creek, a tributary of Pine Creek, in the midst of the Tiadaghton State Forest. A dam on the creek has created a lake covering 94 acres (38 ha) for fishing, boating, and swimming. The park is on Pennsylvania Route 4001, 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of the unincorporated village of Waterville or 8 miles (13 km) southwest of the village of English Center. The nearest borough is Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, about 15 miles (24 km) south at the mouth of Pine Creek on the West Branch Susquehanna River.

Upper Pine Bottom State Park

Upper Pine Bottom State Park is a 5-acre (2.0 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is in Cummings Township on Pennsylvania Route 44 and is surrounded by the Tiadaghton State Forest. It is on Upper Pine Bottom Run, which gave the park its name and is a tributary of Pine Creek. Upper Pine Bottom State Park is in the Pine Creek Gorge, where the streams have cut through five major rock formations from the Devonian and Carboniferous periods.

Colton Point State Park

Colton Point State Park is a 368-acre (149 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is on the west side of the Pine Creek Gorge, also known as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, which is 800 feet (240 m) deep and nearly 4,000 feet (1,200 m) across at this location. The park extends from the creek in the bottom of the gorge up to the rim and across part of the plateau to the west. Colton Point State Park is known for its views of the Pine Creek Gorge, and offers opportunities for picnicking, hiking, fishing and hunting, whitewater boating, and camping. Colton Point is surrounded by Tioga State Forest and its sister park, Leonard Harrison State Park, on the east rim. The park is on a state forest road in Shippen Township 5 miles (8 km) south of U.S. Route 6.

Ravensburg State Park Pennsylvania state park in Crawford Township in Clinton County, Pennsylvania in the United States

Ravensburg State Park is a Pennsylvania state park in Crawford Township in Clinton County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is in a gorge carved by Rauchtown Run through the side of Nippenose Mountain. Ravensburg State Park is 78 acres (32 ha) of wooded land that is almost entirely surrounded by Tiadaghton State Forest. This state park is on Pennsylvania Route 880, 8 miles (13 km) north of Carroll and 8 miles (13 km) south-east of Jersey Shore. The nearest city is Williamsport.

Leonard Harrison State Park Pennsylvania state park in tioga country

Leonard Harrison State Park is a 585-acre (237 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is on the east rim of the Pine Creek Gorge, also known as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, which is 800 feet (240 m) deep and nearly 4,000 feet (1,200 m) across here. It also serves as headquarters for the adjoining Colton Point State Park, its sister park on the west rim of the gorge. Leonard Harrison State Park is known for its views of the Pine Creek Gorge, and offers hiking, fishing and hunting, whitewater boating, and camping. The park is in Shippen and Delmar Townships, 10 miles (16 km) west of Wellsboro at the western terminus of Pennsylvania Route 660.

Pine Creek Rail Trail

The Pine Creek Rail Trail is a rail trail in the Appalachian Mountains of north-central Pennsylvania.

West Rim Trail

The West Rim Trail is a 30.5 mi (49.1 km) hiking trail along Pine Creek in Lycoming and Tioga Counties in north central Pennsylvania in the United States. The trail runs along Pine Creek Gorge, also known as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, which is 800 feet (240 m) deep and about 2,000 feet (610 m) wide from rim to rim in the area traversed by the West Rim Trail. The trail is entirely within the Tioga State Forest and is known for its large number of vistas overlooking the gorge, which is a National Natural Landmark. The West Rim Trail was chosen by Outside Magazine as its "Best Hike in Pennsylvania" in April, 1996.

Pine Creek Gorge

Pine Creek Gorge, sometimes called The Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, is a 47-mile (76 km) gorge carved into the Allegheny Plateau by Pine Creek in north-central Pennsylvania.

Golden Eagle Trail

The Golden Eagle Trail is a 9-mile (14 km) circuit trail located in Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. The trail falls mostly within the boundaries of Wolf Run Wild Area, one of 16 designated wild areas in the Pennsylvania state forest system. Constructed by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Waterdale Youth Group, the trail is blazed in orange and is known for its many vistas overlooking Pine Creek Gorge.

References

  1. Owlett, Steven E. (1993). "The Death of a Forest". Seasons Along The Tiadaghton: An Environmental History of the Pine Creek Gorge (1st ed.). Petaluma, California: Interprint. pp. 53–62. ISBN   0-9635905-0-2.
  2. "History of the William Penn State Forest". Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Archived from the original on 2007-08-23. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  3. "Consumer Price Index (Estimate) 1800-2008". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. 2009. Retrieved February 25, 2009.
  4. Thorpe, R.R. (1997). The Crown Jewel of Pennsylvania: The State Forest System. Pennsylvania Forestry Association, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the U.S. Forest Service. pp. 68–70. OCLC   37033507.
  5. 1 2 A Public Use Map for Tiadaghton State Forest (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Forestry. June 2009.Note: This is a map on one side, with a guide to the state forest and its resources on the other side
  6. Mary Byrd Davis (23 January 2008). "Old Growth in the East: A Survey. Pennsylvania" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 February 2012.