Tian Qi (cricketer)

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Tian Qi
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Source: Cricinfo, 9 December 2017

Tian Qi (田琪) is a Chinese cricketer. [1] Tian Qi made her international debut at the 2015 ICC Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier. She is one of the current members of the Chinese women's cricket team.[ citation needed ]

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An Ruzi, also called Yan Ruzi, was for a few months in 489 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Tu (呂荼), ancestral name Jiang, and An Ruzi was his posthumous title, ruzi meaning "little boy". Due to his short reign and young age he was not given the normal ducal title. He was known as Prince Tu before ascending the throne.

Duke Dao of Qi was from 488 to 485 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Yangsheng (呂陽生), ancestral name Jiang, and Duke Dao was his posthumous title. Before ascending the throne he was known as Prince Yangsheng.

Duke Jian of Qi was from 484 to 481 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Ren (呂壬), ancestral name Jiang, and Duke Jian was his posthumous title.

Duke Ping of Qi was from 480 to 456 BC the titular ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Ao (呂驁), ancestral name Jiang, and Duke Ping was his posthumous title.

Duke Xuan of Qi was from 455 to 405 BC the titular ruler of the State of Qi during the transition from the Spring and Autumn to the Warring States period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Ji (呂積), ancestral name Jiang, and Duke Xuan was his posthumous title.

Duke Kang of Qi was from 404 to 386 BC the titular ruler of the State of Qi during the early Warring States period of ancient China. His personal name was Lü Dai (呂貸), ancestral name Jiang, and Duke Kang was his posthumous title. He was the final Qi ruler from the House of Jiang.

Duke Tai of Tian Qi was from 386 to 384 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Warring States period of ancient China. He was the first Qi ruler from the House of Tian, replacing the House of Jiang that had ruled the state for over six centuries.

Yan, Marquis of Tian was from 383 to 375 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Warring States period of ancient China. His personal name was Tián Yǎn (田剡), and ancestral name Gui.

Duke Huan of Tian Qi was from 374 to 357 BC ruler of the State of Qi, a major power during the Warring States period of ancient China. Duke Huan's personal name was Tian Wu (田午), and ancestral name Gui. His official posthumous title was simply Duke Huan of Qi, but he is commonly called Duke Huan of Tian Qi to be distinguished from the original Duke Huan of Qi from the House of Jiang, who was the first of the Five Hegemons of the Spring and Autumn period.

Tian Jian,Houzhu of Tian Qi was the last king of Qi, one of the seven major states of the Warring States period of ancient China. His personal name was Tian Jian (田建), ancestral name Gui, and he did not have a posthumous title because he was the last king of Qi however he was known as Houzhu of Qi because he was the last ruler of Qi.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Xiao Qi Ji</span> Panda cub born at National Zoo, Washington, D.C.

Xiao Qi Ji is a male giant panda cub who was born at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on August 21, 2020. The fourth surviving cub of Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, Xiao Qi Ji is a result of an artificial insemination of Mei Xiang on March 22, 2020. Xiao Qi Ji is the youngest brother of Tai Shan, Bao Bao and Bei Bei.

References

  1. "Profile - Cricinfo". Cricinfo . Retrieved 9 December 2017.