Tian Shan Pai

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Tian Shan Pai or Tianshan Pai may refer to:

The Mount Heaven Sect, also known as the Tianshan Sect, is a fictional martial arts sect mentioned in works of wuxia fiction, most notably Liang Yusheng's Qijian Xia Tianshan. It also appears in Jin Yong's Demi-Gods and Semi-Devils as a minor sect that plays an important role in the story line of one of the three protagonists, Xuzhu. The sect is named after the place where it is based, the Tian Shan mountain range in western China.

Tien Shan Pai

Tien Shan Pai is a northern style of Kung-fu which stresses rhythm, the demonstration of power accentuated by solid thuds made by the hands, the emitting of power from the entire body, the coordination of the hands and feet as well as blocks and strikes, high kicks and low sweeps, as well as locking and throwing techniques. At the same time it also contains graceful empty-hand and weapons forms. Tien Shan Pai self-defense is characterized by angular attacks coupled with multiple blocks. If one block fails, the second can cover. Footwork is considered essential to countering attacks. Tien Shan Pai focuses on low and steady steps to the side, along with swift "hidden" steps to trick the opponent. Paired boxing forms and exercises are emphasized for timing and accurate evaluation of distance in reference to a moving, responsive adversary.

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Wudang Mountains mountain range in Hubei Province of Peoples Republic of China

The Wudang Mountains consist of a small mountain range in the northwestern part of Hubei, China, just south of Shiyan. They are home to a famous complex of Taoist temples and monasteries associated with the god Xuanwu. The Wudang Mountains are renowned for the practice of Tai chi and Taoism as the Taoist counterpart to the Shaolin Monastery, which is affiliated with Chinese Chán Buddhism. The Wudang Mountains are one of the "Four Sacred Mountains of Taoism" in China, an important destination for Taoist pilgrimages.

Styles of Chinese martial arts Overview of the fighting styles

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<i>The Swordsman</i> (1990 film) 1990 film by King Hu, Ching Siu-tung, Ann Hui, Tsui Hark, Andrew Kam

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Wudang Mountains is a mountain range and World Heritage Site in Hubei, China.