Tian mo

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Tian mo (甜沫) is a traditional breakfast soup from the city of Jinan in the Shandong province of China. The soup is made of millet power, peanuts, vermicelli, cowpea, spiced tofu (or shredded tofu skin), and spinach. [1] The soup has a thick texture once cooked and has a salty taste. It is normally eaten with Youtiao.

Jinan Prefecture-level & Sub-provincial city in Shandong, Peoples Republic of China

Jinan, formerly romanized as Tsinan, is the capital of Shandong province in Eastern China. The area of present-day Jinan has played an important role in the history of the region from the earliest beginnings of civilization and has evolved into a major national administrative, economic, and transportation hub. The city has held sub-provincial administrative status since 1994. Jinan is often called the "Spring City" for its famous 72 artesian springs. Its population was 6.8 million at the 2010 census.

Shandong Province

Shandong is a coastal province of the People's Republic of China, and is part of the East China region.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

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References

  1. Tian mo Baidu wiki, Retrieved 21 September 2012