Tianjin–Pukou Railway Operation

Last updated
Tientsin – Pukow Railway Operation
Part of the Second Sino-Japanese War
DateAugust – November 1937
Location
Result Japanese victory
Belligerents
Merchant flag of Japan (1870).svg Japan Flag of the Republic of China.svg China
Commanders and leaders
War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army (1868-1945).svg Toshizō Nishio Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg Song Zheyuan
Units involved

War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army (1868-1945).svg  Imperial Japanese Army

Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg  National Revolutionary Army

The Japanese 津浦線作戦 or Tientsin–Pukow Railway Operation (Early August to mid November, 1937) was a follow up operation to the Battle of Beiping-Tianjin of the Japanese army in North China at the beginning of the Second Sino-Japanese War, thought concurrently with the Beiping–Hankou Railway Operation. The Tientsin–Pukow Railway Operation was not authorized by Imperial General Headquarters. The Japanese advanced following the line of the Tianjin-Pukou Railway aiming to the Yangtze River without meeting much resistance. The Japanese advance stopped at Jinan 36°40′N116°59′E / 36.67°N 116.98°E / 36.67; 116.98 on Yellow River after majority of the participating Japanese forces were redirected for the Battle of Taiyuan and replaced by parts of the newly formed 109th division.

Second Sino-Japanese War military conflict between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from 1937 to 1945

The Second Sino-Japanese War was a military conflict fought primarily between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from July 7, 1937, to September 2, 1945. It began with the Marco Polo Bridge Incident in 1937 in which a dispute between Japanese and Chinese troops escalated into a battle. Some sources in the modern People's Republic of China date the beginning of the war to the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931. It is known as the War of Resistance in China.

Imperial General Headquarters Part of the Supreme War Council of Japan

The Imperial General Headquarters was part of the Supreme War Council and was established in 1893 to coordinate efforts between the Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy during wartime. In terms of function, it was approximately equivalent to the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff and the British Chiefs of Staff Committee.

Contents

Aftermath

After the stalemate at Yellow River from November 1937 to March 1938, the fighting resumed resulting in Battle of Xuzhou.

Yellow River second longest river in China

The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in China, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5,464 km (3,395 mi). Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai province of Western China, it flows through nine provinces, and it empties into the Bohai Sea near the city of Dongying in Shandong province. The Yellow River basin has an east–west extent of about 1,900 kilometers (1,180 mi) and a north–south extent of about 1,100 km (680 mi). Its total drainage area is about 752,546 square kilometers (290,560 sq mi).

Battle of Xuzhou battle

The Battle of Xuzhou was a military conflict between the Empire of Japan and the Republic of China forces in May 1938 during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

See also

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Order of battle Tianjin–Pukou Railway Operation

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Events in the year 1937 in Japan.

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References