Tianqing

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Tianqing (天慶) was a Chinese era name used by several emperors of China. It may refer to:

A Chinese era name is the regnal year, reign period, or regnal title used when traditionally numbering years in an emperor's reign and naming certain Chinese rulers. Some emperors have several era names, one after another, where each beginning of a new era resets the numbering of the year back to year one or yuán (元). The numbering of the year increases on the first day of the Chinese calendar each year. The era name originated as a motto or slogan chosen by an emperor.

Dae Yeon-rim was the founder of the Heung-yo kingdom, which was a successor-state of Balhae.

Emperor Tianzuo of Liao, personal name Yelü Yanxi, courtesy name Yanning, was the ninth and last emperor of the Khitan-led Liao dynasty. He succeeded his grandfather, Emperor Daozong, in 1101 and reigned until the fall of the Liao dynasty in 1125.

Emperor Huanzong 桓宗 (1177–1206), born Li Chunyou 李純佑, was the 6th emperor of the Western Xia.

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