Tianshou

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Tianshou (天授) was a Chinese era name used by several emperors of China. It may refer to:

A Chinese era name is the regnal year, reign period, or regnal title used when traditionally numbering years in an emperor's reign and naming certain Chinese rulers. Some emperors have several era names, one after another, where each beginning of a new era resets the numbering of the year back to year one or yuán (元). The numbering of the year increases on the first day of the Chinese calendar each year. The era name originated as a motto or slogan chosen by an emperor.

Wu Zetian founding empress of the Zhou Dynasty

Wu Zetian, alternatively named Wu Zhao, Wu Hou, during the later Tang dynasty as Tian Hou, in English as Empress Consort Wu or by the deprecated term "Empress Wu", was a Chinese sovereign who ruled unofficially as empress consort and empress dowager and officially as empress regnant (皇帝) during the brief Zhou dynasty, which interrupted the Tang dynasty. Wu was the sole officially recognized empress regnant of China in more than two millennia.

Duan Zhengchun was the 15th emperor of the Kingdom of Dali. He reigned from 1096 to 1108. He was the younger brother of Duan Zhengming, and the first ruler of the Later Dali Kingdom.

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Chinese sovereign

The Chinese sovereign is the ruler of a particular period in ancient China, and later imperial China. Several titles and naming schemes have been used throughout history.

Emperor or Huangdi was the imperial title of the Chinese sovereign from 221 BCE to the early 20th century. It was established by Qin Shi Huang, the First Emperor, after the reunification of the lands of the Zhou dynasty. It replaced the Zhou's own title of wáng ("king"), which had been appropriated by numerous warlords during the Warring States Era. The Chinese title is not grammatically gendered, but the only empress to bear it was Wu Zetian, who briefly replaced the Tang dynasty with her own in the years 690–705 CE. Use of the title is considered to have officially ended with the abdication of Puyi in 1912 following the Xinhai Revolution and the establishment of the Republic of China, although there were two failed attempts to reestablish an imperial government in China in 1915 and 1917.

A posthumous name is an honorary name given to royalty, nobles, and sometimes others, in East Asia after the person's death, and is used almost exclusively instead of one's personal name or other official titles during their life. The posthumous name is commonly used when naming royalty of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan.

Japanese calendar calendar

Japanese calendar types have included a range of official and unofficial systems. At present, Japan uses the Gregorian calendar together with year designations stating the year of the reign of the current Emperor.

The Japanese era name , also known as gengō (元号), is the first of the two elements that identify years in the Japanese era calendar scheme. The second element, a number, counts the years since the era began; as in many other systems, there is no year zero. For example, the first year of the Heisei period was 1989 CE, or "Heisei 1", so the year 2019 CE in this scheme is "Heisei 31".

Ming tombs tomb

The Ming tombs are a collection of mausoleums built by the emperors of the Ming dynasty of China. The first Ming emperor's tomb is located near his capital Nanjing. However, the majority of the Ming tombs are located in a cluster near Beijing and collectively known as the Thirteen Tombs of the Ming Dynasty. They are within the suburban Changping District of Beijing Municipality, 42 kilometres (26 mi) north-northwest of Beijing city center. The site, on the southern slope of Tianshou Mountain, was chosen based on the principles of feng shui by the third Ming emperor, the Yongle Emperor. After the construction of the Imperial Palace in 1420, the Yongle Emperor selected his burial site and created his own mausoleum. The subsequent emperors placed their tombs in the same valley.

China Academy of Art

China Academy of Art, also translated as China National Academy of Fine Arts, is a fine arts college under the direct charge of the Ministry of Culture of China. It was founded in Hangzhou in 1928 by the government of the Republic of China and the renowned educator Cai Yuanpei. It was the first art university and first graduate school in Chinese history. It is a Chinese Ministry of Education Double First Class Discipline University, with Double First Class status in certain disciplines.

A regnal year is a year of the reign of a sovereign, from the Latin regnum meaning kingdom, rule.

Yan Shun is a fictional character in Water Margin, one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. Nicknamed "Multicoloured Tiger", he ranks 50th among the 108 Stars of Destiny and 14th among the 72 Earthly Fiends.

Zheng Tianshou is a fictional character in Water Margin, one of the Four Great Classical Novels in Chinese literature. Nicknamed "Fair-skinned Gentleman", he ranks 74th among the 108 Stars of Destiny and 38th among the 72 Earthly Fiends.

Wang Ying is a fictional character in Water Margin, one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. Nicknamed "Stumpy Tiger", he ranks 58th among the 108 Stars of Destiny and 22nd among the 72 Earthly Fiends.

Empire of China (1915–1916) 1915–1916 country

The Empire of China was a short-lived attempt by statesman and general Yuan Shikai from late 1915 to early 1916 to reinstate monarchy in China, with himself as the Hongxian Emperor. The attempt was ultimately a failure; it set back the Chinese republican cause by many years and fractured China into a period of conflict between various local warlords.

Minguo calendar calendar era used by the Republic of China, starting from 1912 CE (= year 1 of Minguo era)

The Republic of China Calendar is the official calendar of the Republic of China. It is used to number the years for official purposes only in Taiwan area after 1949. It was used in Chinese mainland from 1912 until the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949.

This is a family tree of Chinese emperors from the Mongol conquest of 1279 to the end of the Qing dynasty in 1912.

Pan Tianshou Chinese artist and historian

Pan Tianshou was a Chinese painter and art educator.

Tiantong Temple

Tiantong Temple is a Buddhist temple located in Taibai Mountainin of Yinzhou District, Ningbo, Zhejiang, in the People's Republic of China. The temple covers a total area of 76,400 square metres (822,000 sq ft), with more than 38,800 square metres (418,000 sq ft) of floor space. Tiantong Temple is listed as one of the "Five Chan Buddhism Temples". Tiantong Temple is the cradle of the Sōtō school of Japanese Buddhism.