Tianya Haijiao

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Tianya Haijiao - 01.jpg
The Rock of Sun and Moon Riyue.jpg
The Rock of Sun and Moon
The Tianya (Tian Ya ) Cliff Tianya.jpg
The Tianya (天涯) Cliff
Southern Heaven Rock Nantianyizhu.jpg
Southern Heaven Rock
Another rock with a famous Chinese poem inscribed on it Tianyahaijiao.jpg
Another rock with a famous Chinese poem inscribed on it

Tianya Haijiao (Chinese :天涯海角; pinyin :Tiānyá Hǎijiǎo; literally: 'Edges of the heaven, corners of the sea') is a popular visitor attraction 24 kilometres (15 mi) west of Sanya city, Hainan, China.

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The venue is considered the southernmost point of China's land area despite the fact that Jinmu Cape actually is. It is for this reason that it is a popular sightseeing destination for tourists, as well as the fact that, on clear days, various islets are visible.

In Chinese literature, the cape is mentioned in many famous poems, such as "I will follow you to Tian-Ya-Hai-Jiao", which means the couple will never be separated. Therefore, many newlyweds spend part of their honeymoon visiting the place.

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Coordinates: 18°17′28″N109°20′50″E / 18.2911°N 109.3472°E / 18.2911; 109.3472