Tianyou

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Tianyou (天祐) was a Chinese era name used by several emperors of China. It may refer to:

A Chinese era name is the regnal year, reign period, or regnal title used when traditionally numbering years in an emperor's reign and naming certain Chinese rulers. Some emperors have several era names, one after another, where each beginning of a new era resets the numbering of the year back to year one or yuán (元). The numbering of the year increases on the first day of the Chinese calendar each year. The era name originated as a motto or slogan chosen by an emperor.

Emperor Ai of Tang, also known as Emperor Zhaoxuan (昭宣帝), born Li Zuo, later known as Li Chu, was the last emperor of the Tang dynasty of China. He reigned—as but a puppet ruler—from 904 to 907. Emperor Ai was the son of Emperor Zhaozong.

Duan Zhengming was the 14th ruler of the Dali Kingdom. In 1081, the regent Gao Zhisheng forced Duan Zhengming's predecessor, Duan Shouhui, to abdicate and replaced him with Duan Zhengming. In 1094, Gao Shengtai, Gao Zhisheng's son, forced Duan Zhengming to relinquish the throne to him and renamed the Dali Kingdom to "Dazhong Kingdom". Gao Shengtai ruled briefly until his death in 1096, after which the throne was returned to the Duan family – Duan Zhengming's younger brother, Duan Zhengchun, became the new ruler and restored the kingdom's former name.

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