Tiaprofenic acid

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Tiaprofenic acid
Tiaprofenic acid.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Surgam, Surgamyl, Tiaprofen, others
Other names5-Benzoyl-α-methyl-2-thiopheneacetic acid
AHFS/Drugs.com Micromedex Detailed Consumer Information
Pregnancy
category
  • C
Routes of
administration
oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 90%
Metabolism 10% hepatic
Elimination half-life 1.5-2.5h
Excretion 50-80% urine
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard 100.046.649 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H12O3S
Molar mass 260.309 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
Chirality Racemic mixture
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Tiaprofenic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the arylpropionic acid (profen) class, used to treat pain, especially arthritic pain. The typical adult dose is 300 mg twice daily. It is not recommended in children.

Long-term use of tiaprofenic acid is associated with severe cystitis, roughly 100 times more commonly than other NSAIDs. [1] It is contraindicated in patients with cystitis and urinary tract infections. It is sparingly metabolised in the liver to two inactive metabolites. Most of the drug is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Renal disease impairs excretion, and it should be used with caution in renal disease.

It was patented in 1969 and approved for medical use in 1981. [2] It is available in generic formulations. A sustained-release preparation is available. It is an isomer of Suprofen.

Related Research Articles

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are members of a drug class that reduces pain, decreases fever, prevents blood clots, and in higher doses, decreases inflammation. Side effects depend on the specific drug but largely include an increased risk of gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeds, heart attack, and kidney disease.

Peptic ulcer disease Ulcer of an area of the gastrointestinal tract

Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is a break in the inner lining of the stomach, the first part of the small intestine, or sometimes the lower esophagus. An ulcer in the stomach is called a gastric ulcer, while one in the first part of the intestines is a duodenal ulcer. The most common symptoms of a duodenal ulcer are waking at night with upper abdominal pain and upper abdominal pain that improves with eating. With a gastric ulcer, the pain may worsen with eating. The pain is often described as a burning or dull ache. Other symptoms include belching, vomiting, weight loss, or poor appetite. About a third of older people have no symptoms. Complications may include bleeding, perforation, and blockage of the stomach. Bleeding occurs in as many as 15% of cases.

Ibuprofen Medication used for treating pain, fever, and inflammation

Ibuprofen is a medication in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) class that is used for treating pain, fever, and inflammation. This includes painful menstrual periods, migraines, and rheumatoid arthritis. It may also be used to close a patent ductus arteriosus in a premature baby. It can be used by mouth or intravenously. It typically begins working within an hour.

Diclofenac chemical compound

Diclofenac, sold under the brand name Voltaren among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain and inflammatory diseases such as gout. It is taken by mouth, used by injection, or applied to the skin. Improvements in pain typically occur within half an hour and last for as much as eight hours. It is also available in combination with misoprostol in an effort to decrease stomach problems.

Naproxen chemical compound

Naproxen, sold under the brand name Aleve among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain, menstrual cramps, inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, and fever. It is taken by mouth. It is available in immediate and delayed release formulations. Onset of effects is within an hour and last for up to twelve hours.

Anti-inflammatory is the property of a substance or treatment that reduces inflammation or swelling. Anti-inflammatory drugs make up about half of analgesics, remedying pain by reducing inflammation as opposed to opioids, which affect the central nervous system to block pain signaling to the brain.

Phenylbutazone chemical compound

Phenylbutazone, often referred to as "bute", is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for the short-term treatment of pain and fever in animals.

Esomeprazole Stomach acid suppressing medication

Esomeprazole, sold under the brand names Nexium among others, is a medication which reduces stomach acid. It is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, and Zollinger–Ellison syndrome. Effectiveness is similar to other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). It is taken by mouth or injection into a vein.

Cystinuria amino acid metabolic disorder that involves the formation of cystine stones in the kidneys, ureter, and bladder

Cystinuria is an inherited autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by high concentrations of the amino acid cystine in the urine, leading to the formation of cystine stones in the kidneys, ureter, and bladder. It is a type of aminoaciduria. "Cystine", not "cysteine," is implicated in this disease; the former is a dimer of the latter.

Indometacin chemical compound

Indometacin, also known as indomethacin, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used as a prescription medication to reduce fever, pain, stiffness, and swelling from inflammation. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, endogenous signaling molecules known to cause these symptoms. It does this by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the production of prostaglandins.

Mefenamic acid chemical compound

Mefenamic acid is a member of the anthranilic acid derivatives class of NSAID drugs, and is used to treat mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain, and is sometimes used to prevent migraines associated with menstruation. It is not widely used in the United States due to its side effects and high cost compared to other NSAIDs.

Oxaprozin chemical compound

Oxaprozin, also known as oxaprozinum, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), used to relieve the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Chemically, it is a propionic acid derivative. Safety and efficacy has been established in children over 6 years with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis only, and there is an increased risk of adverse reactions in the elderly population.

Meloxicam Medical compound

Meloxicam, sold under the brand name Mobic among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain and inflammation in rheumatic diseases and osteoarthritis. It is used by mouth or by injection into a vein. It is recommended that it be used for as short a period as possible and at a low dose.

Ketorolac chemical compound

Ketorolac, sold under the brand name Toradol among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain. Specifically it is recommended for moderate to severe pain. Recommended duration of treatment is less than six days. It is used by mouth, by nose, by injection into a vein or muscle, and as eye drops. Effects begin within an hour and last for up to eight hours.

Carprofen Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Carprofen, marketed under many brand names worldwide, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that veterinarians prescribe as a supportive treatment for various conditions in animals. It provides day-to-day treatment for pain and inflammation from various kinds of joint pain as well as post-operative pain. Carprofen reduces inflammation by inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2; its specificity for COX-2 varies from species to species.

Norfloxacin chemical compound, antibiotic

Norfloxacin, sold under the brand name Noroxin among others, is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics. It is used to treat urinary tract infections, gynecological infections, inflammation of the prostate gland, gonorrhea and bladder infection. Eye drops were approved for use in children older than one year of age.

Diflunisal chemical compound

Diflunisal is a salicylic acid derivative with analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. It was developed by Merck Sharp & Dohme in 1971, as MK647, after showing promise in a research project studying more potent chemical analogs of aspirin. It was first sold under the brand name Dolobid, marketed by Merck & Co., but generic versions are now widely available. It is classed as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and is available in 250 mg and 500 mg tablets.

Deracoxib chemical compound

Deracoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the coxib class, used in dogs to treat pain associated with osteoarthritis, or to prevent pain following orthopedic or dental surgery. It is available as beef-flavored tablets.

Tenoxicam chemical compound

Tenoxicam, sold under the brand name Mobiflex among others, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used to relieve inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, tendinitis, bursitis, and periarthritis of the shoulders or hips.

Urologic diseases or conditions include urinary tract infections, kidney stones, bladder control problems, and prostate problems, among others. Some urologic conditions do not affect a person for that long and some are lifetime conditions. Kidney diseases are normally investigated and treated by nephrologists, while the specialty of urology deals with problems in the other organs. Gynecologists may deal with problems of incontinence in women.

References

  1. Crawford MLA, Waller PC, Wood SM (1997). "Severe cystitis associated with tiaprofenic acid". British Journal of Urology. 79 (4): 578–584. doi:10.1046/j.1464-410X.1997.00094.x. PMID   9126086.
  2. Fischer, Jnos; Ganellin, C. Robin (2006). Analogue-based Drug Discovery. John Wiley & Sons. p. 520. ISBN   9783527607495.