Tibabuyes

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Tibabuyes Wetland
Humedal Tibabuyes
Juan Amarillo Wetland

Humedal tibabuyes.jpg

Tibabuyes Wetland
Colombia Bogota location map.png
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Location in Bogotá
Location Suba, Engativá, Bogotá
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Coordinates 4°43′49.79″N74°06′34.9″W / 4.7304972°N 74.109694°W / 4.7304972; -74.109694 Coordinates: 4°43′49.79″N74°06′34.9″W / 4.7304972°N 74.109694°W / 4.7304972; -74.109694
Area 222.58 ha (550.0 acres)
Elevation 2,539 m (8,330 ft)
Designated September 2003
Named for Muysccubun: "land of the farmers"
Administrator EAAB - ESP
Website Humedal de Tibabuyes

Tibabuyes (Spanish : Humedal de Tibabuyes) or Juan Amarillo Wetland is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the localities Suba and Engativá, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland, in the Juan Amarillo River basin on the Bogotá savanna is the largest of the wetlands of Bogotá and covers an area of 222 hectares (550 acres). [1]

Spanish language Romance language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in the Americas and Spain. It is a global language and the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.

Wetland A land area that is permanently or seasonally saturated with water

A wetland is a distinct ecosystem that is inundated by water, either permanently or seasonally, where oxygen-free processes prevail. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants, adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of functions, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients, stabilization of shorelines, and support of plants and animals. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life. Whether any individual wetland performs these functions, and the degree to which it performs them, depends on characteristics of that wetland and the lands and waters near it. Methods for rapidly assessing these functions, wetland ecological health, and general wetland condition have been developed in many regions and have contributed to wetland conservation partly by raising public awareness of the functions and the ecosystem services some wetlands provide.

Wetlands of Bogotá

Wetlands of Bogotá, Colombia are important areas of the capital city, and their development has become increasingly important for the area north of the Andes. A reserve for fauna and flora, the wetlands provide for the preservation and reproduction of a wide variety of mammals, reptiles and birds. These include more than 70 species of migratory birds, as well as many endemic plant species. The wetlands are part of the Bogotá River basin.

Contents

Etymology

The name Tibabuyes comes from Muysccubun, the language of the indigenous Muisca, who inhabited the Bogotá savanna before the Spanish conquest, and means "land of the farmers". [1]

Chibcha language extinct language of Colombia, spoken by the Muisca, one of the four advanced indigenous civilizations of the Americas

Chibcha is an extinct language of Colombia, spoken by the Muisca, one of the four advanced indigenous civilizations of the Americas. The Muisca inhabited the central highlands of what today is the country of Colombia.

Spanish conquest of the Muisca Part of the Spanish conquest of Colombia

The Spanish conquest of the Muisca took place from 1537 to 1540. The Muisca were the inhabitants of the central Andean highlands of Colombia before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. They were organised in a loose confederation of different rulers; the zipa of Bacatá, with his headquarters in Funza, the zaque of Hunza, the iraca of the sacred City of the Sun Sugamuxi, the Tundama of Tundama, and several independent caciques. The leaders of the Confederation at the time of conquest were zipa Tisquesusa, zaque Quemuenchatocha, iraca Sugamuxi and Tundama in the northernmost portion of their territories. The Muisca were organised in small communities of circular enclosures, with a central square where the bohío of the cacique was located. They were called "Salt People" because of their extraction of salt in various locations throughout their territories, mainly in Zipaquirá, Nemocón and Tausa. For the main part self-sufficient in their well-organised economy, the Muisca traded with the European conquistadors valuable products as gold, tumbaga and emeralds with their neighbouring indigenous groups. In the Tenza Valley, to the east of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense where the majority of the Muisca lived, they extracted emeralds in Chivor and Somondoco. The economy of the Muisca was rooted in their agriculture with main products maize, yuca, potatoes and various other cultivations elaborated on elevated fields. Agriculture had started around 3000 BCE on the Altiplano, following the preceramic Herrera Period and a long epoch of hunter-gatherers since the late Pleistocene. The earliest archaeological evidence of inhabitation in Colombia, and one of the oldest in South America, has been found in El Abra, dating to around 12,500 years BP.

Flora and fauna

Birds

Tibabuyes hosts 22 bird species. [2]

See also

Biodiversity of Colombia

Colombia is the country with the second-highest biodiversity in the world, behind Brazil. As of 2016, 56,343 species are registered in Colombia, of which 9,153 are endemic. The country occupies the first position worldwide in number of orchids and birds, second position in plants, amphibians, butterflies and fresh water fish, third place in species of palm trees and reptiles and globally holds the fourth position in biodiversity of mammals.

Bogotá savanna

The Bogotá savanna is a montane savanna, located in the southwestern part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the center of Colombia. The Bogotá savanna has an extent of 4,251.6 square kilometres (1,641.6 sq mi) and an average altitude of 2,550 metres (8,370 ft). The savanna is situated in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes.

Thomas van der Hammen Natural Reserve Forest reserve

The Thomas van der Hammen Natural Reserve or Thomas van der Hammen Forest Reserve is an area of the Bogotá savanna that is under environmental protection. The natural reserve was declared as such in year 2000 by the Ministry of Environment and Sustainable development. It takes its name from the Dutch-Colombian geologist Thomas van der Hammen who devoted his life to the research of the region. The surface area of the protected reserve is approximately 1,395 hectares and it is located in the north of Bogotá.

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Córdoba (wetland) swamp in Colombia

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Jaboque

Jaboque is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the locality Engativá, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland, close to the Bogotá River on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of 148 hectares. The wetland is close to El Dorado International Airport in the Juan Amarillo River basin.

La Vaca

La Vaca or Techovita is a small wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the locality Kennedy, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland, in the Tunjuelo River basin on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of about 8 hectares. La Vaca is close to the Avenidad Ciudad de Cali.

Techo (wetland)

Techo is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the neighbourhood Techo in the locality Kennedy, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of about 11.6 hectares. Techo is located in the basins of the Bogotá River and its main tributaries Fucha and Tunjuelo.

La Conejera swamp in Colombia

La Conejera is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the locality Suba, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland, in the Juan Amarillo River basin on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of 58.9 hectares.

Santa María del Lago wetland in columbia

Santa María del Lago is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the locality Engativá, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of 12 hectares, of which 4 hectares water.

Fucha River

The Fucha River is a river on the Bogotá savanna and a left tributary of the Bogotá River. The river originates in the Eastern Hills of the Colombian capital Bogotá and flows westward through the city into the Bogotá River. It is one of the three important rivers of the city, together with the Tunjuelo and Juan Amarillo Rivers.

Tunjuelo River

The Tunjuelo or Tunjuelito River is a river on the Bogotá savanna and a left tributary of the Bogotá River. The river, with a length of 73 kilometres (45 mi) originates in the Sumapaz Páramo and flows northward through the Usme Synclinal to enter the Colombian capital Bogotá. There, the river is mostly canalised flowing westward into the Bogotá River. It is one of the three main rivers of the city, together with the Fucha and Juan Amarillo Rivers.

Tibanica

Tibanica is a wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located on the border of the locality Bosa, Bogotá and Soacha, Cundinamarca, Colombia. The wetland on the Bogotá savanna covers an area of about 28.8 hectares. Tibanica is located in the Tunjuelo River basin.

El Salitre (wetland)

El Salitre is a small wetland, one of the wetlands of Bogotá. It is located within Salitre Park, close to Salitre Mágico, an amusement park north of Simón Bolívar Park in the locality Barrios Unidos of the Colombian capital Bogotá. The area of El Salitre is 6.4 hectares.

La Isla (wetland)

La Isla is a small wetland, part of the wetlands of Bogotá. It is located next to the Tunjuelo River in the locality Bosa, Bogotá, Colombia. The Bogotá River passes 800 metres (2,600 ft) south of the wetland with an area of 7.7 hectares.

Meandro del Say

Meandro del Say is a wetland, part of the wetlands of Bogotá. It spans the locality Fontibón of Bogotá and the eastern part of Mosquera, Cundinamarca. Meandro del Say is located close to the Bogotá River with a total area of 13.6 hectares. The Avenida Centenario borders the wetland in the northeast. Meandro de Say is situated in the Fucha River basin.

La Florida (wetland)

La Florida is a wetland and park known as the Parque Metropolitano La Florida. La Florida is located across the Bogotá River from Jaboque wetland in the municipality Funza, Cundinamarca, close to Cota. La Florida does not belong to the protected wetlands of Bogotá.

Guaymaral y Torca

Guaymaral y Torca is a combined wetland, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, located in the north of the Colombian capital in the localities Suba and Usaquén, Bogotá, Colombia. The wetlands on the Bogotá savanna cover an area of about 73 hectares. Guaymaral y Torca, the northernmost wetlands of Bogotá at the foot of the Eastern Hills, is composed of three parts, Guaymaral in the west in Suba, Torca in the east in Usaquén and a small strip along the dividing Autopista Norte between the two main wetlands. The wetlands are located in the Torca River basin. The Autopista Norte was constructed in 1952, dividing the wetlands.

Arzobispo River

The Juan Amarillo, Arzobispo, or Salitre River is a river on the Bogotá savanna and a left tributary of the Bogotá River in Colombia. The river originates from various quebradas in the Eastern Hills and flows into the Bogotá River at the largest of the wetlands of Bogotá, Tibabuyes, also called Juan Amarillo Wetland. The total surface area of the Juan Amarillo basin, covering the localities Usaquén, Chapinero, Santa Fe, Suba, Barrios Unidos, Teusaquillo, and Engativá, is 12,892 hectares. Together with the Fucha and Tunjuelo Rivers, the Juan Amarillo River forms part of the left tributaries of the Bogotá River in the Colombian capital.

Torca River

The Torca River is a river on the Bogotá savanna and a left tributary of the Bogotá River. The river, in a basin of 6,008.69 hectares (23.1997 sq mi), originates in the Eastern Hills of Bogotá at an altitude of 2,837 metres (9,308 ft). It flows in the north of the Colombian capital, through the locality of Usaquén and into the Bogotá River in Suba at the border with Chía, at 2,545 metres (8,350 ft) above sea level. The Torca wetland is located near its mouth.

References

  1. 1 2 (in Spanish) Website Humedal Tibabuyes
  2. Andrade & Benitez, s.a., p.8

Bibliography

Further reading

<i>El Tiempo</i> (Colombia) Colombian newspaper

El Tiempo is a nationally distributed broadsheet daily newspaper in Colombia. As of 2012, it had the highest circulation in Colombia with an average daily weekday of 1,137,483 readers, rising to 1,921,571 readers for the Sunday edition. After longtime rival El Espectador was reduced to a weekly publication following an internal financial crisis in 2001, El Tiempo enjoyed monopoly status in Colombian media as the only daily that circulated nationally, as most smaller dailies have limited distribution outside their own regions. However, El Espectador returned to the daily format on May 11, 2008.