Tibacuy

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Tibacuy
Municipality and town
Piedra del diablo cumaca vista.JPG
View from Cumaca, rural part of Tibacuy
Flag of Tibacuy (Cundinamarca).svg
Flag
Escudo de Tibacuy.svg
Seal
Colombia - Cundinamarca - Tibacuy.svg
Location of the municipality and town inside Cundinamarca Department of Colombia
Colombia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Tibacuy
Location in Colombia
Coordinates: 4°20′50″N74°27′9″W / 4.34722°N 74.45250°W / 4.34722; -74.45250 Coordinates: 4°20′50″N74°27′9″W / 4.34722°N 74.45250°W / 4.34722; -74.45250
CountryFlag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Department Flag of Cundinamarca.svg Cundinamarca
Province Sumapaz Province
Founded17 February 1592
Founded byBernardino de Albornoz
Government
  MayorEduar Javier Serrano Orjuela
(2016-2019)
Area
   Municipality and town84.4 km2 (32.6 sq mi)
  Urban
0.25 km2 (0.10 sq mi)
Elevation
1,647 m (5,404 ft)
Population
 (2015)
   Municipality and town4,828
  Density57/km2 (150/sq mi)
   Urban
523
Time zone UTC-5 (Colombia Standard Time)
Website Official website

Tibacuy is a municipality and town of Colombia in the department of Cundinamarca, in Sumapaz Province. Tibacuy is situated south of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes at 87 kilometres (54 mi) southeast of the capital Bogotá. [1]

Contents

Climate

Tibacuy - 1647 m
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
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72
 
 
24
15
 
 
90
 
 
24
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109
 
 
25
16
 
 
170
 
 
24
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155
 
 
24
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88
 
 
23
15
 
 
57
 
 
24
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52
 
 
24
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80
 
 
24
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214
 
 
23
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216
 
 
23
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100
 
 
23
15
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Source: Climate-data.org - Tibacuy

Etymology

In the Chibcha language of the Muisca and Panche, Tibacuy means "official chief". [1]

History

The area of Tibacuy was inhabited by the Muisca and the Panche with the Sutagao living to the southeast. The present town centre is situated at a lower altitude than the original indigenous village. Modern Tibacuy was founded between 13th and 17th of February 1592 by Bernardino de Albornoz. [1]

Economy

Main economical activity of Tibacuy is agriculture, predominantly coffee, bananas, tomatoes and blackberries.

Archeology

In Cumaca, rural part of Tibacuy, petroglyphs have been found. [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References