Tibellomma

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Tibellomma
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Sparassidae
Genus: Tibellomma
Simon, 1903 [1]
Species:
T. chazaliae
Binomial name
Tibellomma chazaliae
(Simon, 1898)

Tibellomma is a monotypic genus of Venezuelan huntsman spiders containing the single species, Tibellomma chazaliae. It was first described by Eugène Louis Simon in 1903, [2] and is found in Venezuela. [1] The single species, T. chazaliae, was originally added to Prusias under the name Prusias chazaliae, and was moved to its own genus in 1903. [2]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Gloor, Daniel; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Blick, Theo; Kropf, Christian (2019). "Gen. Tibellomma Simon, 1903". World Spider Catalog Version 20.0. Natural History Museum Bern. doi:10.24436/2 . Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  2. 1 2 Simon, E (1903). Histoire naturelle des araignées. Paris: Roret. doi:10.5962/bhl.title.51973.