Tiber Rocks

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Tiber Rocks
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Tiber Rocks
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 68°23′S67°0′W / 68.383°S 67.000°W / -68.383; -67.000 Coordinates: 68°23′S67°0′W / 68.383°S 67.000°W / -68.383; -67.000
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System
Demographics
PopulationUninhabited

The Tiber Rocks are a group of rocks lying near the head of Rymill Bay, close west of the mouth of Romulus Glacier and 6 kilometres (3 nmi) northwest of the highest summit of Black Thumb, off the west coast of Graham Land. First seen and roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Riddoch Rymill, it was resurveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and so named by them because of the association of these rocks with nearby Romulus and Remus Glaciers.

Rymill Bay bay

Rymill Bay is a bay in Antarctica. It is 16.7 kilometres (9 nmi) wide at its mouth and indents 9.3 kilometres (5 nmi) between Red Rock Ridge and Bertrand Ice Piedmont along the west coast of Graham Land. Rymill Bay was probably first seen from a distance by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot in 1909. The bay was first surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE), and was resurveyed in 1948 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The name is for John Riddoch Rymill, Australian leader of the British Graham Land Expedition.

Romulus Glacier is a glacier, 7 nautical miles (13 km) long and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, which flows from the north slopes of Mount Lupa westward to Rymill Bay between the Blackwall Mountains and Black Thumb, on the west coast of Graham Land. First surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Resurveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), who so named it for its association with Remus Glacier, whose head lies near the head of this glacier.

Black Thumb is a mountain, 1,190 metres (3,900 ft) high, with notched and precipitous sides, standing between Romulus Glacier and Bertrand Ice Piedmont on the west coast of Graham Land. It was charted and named by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tiber Rocks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Martin Glacier is a glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide and 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, which flows west and then northwest from the south side of Mount Lupa to the southeast corner of Rymill Bay where it joins Bertrand Ice Piedmont, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was first surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Riddoch Rymill, and was resurveyed in 1948–1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey. The glacier was named for James H. Martin, a member of the British Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (1929–1931) under Sir Douglas Mawson, and first mate of the Penola during the BGLE.

Lawrie Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Lawrie Glacier is a glacier flowing between Mount Genecand and Mezzo Buttress, and entering the head of Barilari Bay between Cherkovna Point and Prestoy Point on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under Rymill, 1934–37, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Robert Lawrie, an English alpine and polar equipment specialist.

Bilgeri Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bilgeri Glacier is a glacier flowing into Barilari Bay south of Huitfeldt Point and west of Byaga Point, on Velingrad Peninsula on the west coast of Graham Land in Antarctica. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Georg Bilgeri (1873–1934), Austrian pioneer exponent of skiing, inventor of the first spring ski binding, and author of one of the earliest skiing manuals.

Birley Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Birley Glacier is a glacier, at least 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, flowing west into the eastern extremity of Barilari Bay north of Vardun Point, on the west coast of Graham Land. First seen and roughly surveyed in 1909 by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, it was re-surveyed in 1935–36 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill, and later named for Kenneth P. Birley, who contributed toward the cost of the BGLE, 1934–37.

The Blackwall Mountains in Antarctica rise to 1,370 metres (4,500 ft), extending in a west-northwest–east-southeast direction for 5 nautical miles (9 km) and lying close south of Neny Fjord on the west coast of Graham Land. They are bounded to the east by Remus Glacier, to the south by Romulus Glacier, and are separated from Red Rock Ridge to the west by Safety Col. First roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, they were re-surveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and so named by them because the black cliffs of the mountains facing Rymill Bay remain snow free throughout the year.

Centurion Glacier is a small steep glacier flowing northwest to Neny Bay between Mount Nemesis and Roman Four Promontory, on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under Rymill, and resurveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The name, given by FIDS, derives from association with Roman Four Promontory.

Perutz Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Perutz Glacier is a glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, which flows west-northwest from Hemimont Plateau into Bourgeois Fjord, close east of Thomson Head, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. The mouth of the glacier was first surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. The entire glacier was surveyed in 1946-47 and 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and named by them for Max F. Perutz of the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, who has made important studies on the mechanism of glacier flow.

Doyle Glacier is a glacier flowing to the west coast of Graham Land on both sides of Prospect Point. It was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the first Englishman to make a full day's journey on skis, in March 1893.

Forbes Glacier (Graham Land) glacier in Antarctica

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Forel Glacier is a glacier 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) wide and 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, flowing southwest into Blind Bay, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was first roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill. Its lower reaches were surveyed in 1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and the glacier named by them for François-Alphonse Forel, a noted Swiss glacier physicist and author, and first President of the International Commission of Glaciers in 1894.

Goodenough Glacier is a broad sweeping glacier to the south of the Batterbee Mountains, flowing from the west shore of Palmer Land, Antarctica, into George VI Sound and the George VI Ice Shelf. It was discovered in 1936 by A. Stephenson, W.L.S. Fleming, and George C.L. Bertram of the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, while exploring George VI Sound, and was named by Rymill after Margaret Goodenough, wife of Admiral Sir William Goodenough, the latter being one of Rymill's principal supporters in raising funds for the expedition.

Heim Glacier is a glacier 8 nautical miles (15 km) long in the southeast part of Arrowsmith Peninsula, which flows south to merge with the ice in Jones Channel on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. With Antevs Glacier to the north, it forms a transverse depression extending to the southwest part of Lallemand Fjord. Heim Glacier was first sighted from the air in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill. Its lower reaches were surveyed in 1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and the glacier named by them for Albert Heim, a Swiss glaciologist and the author in 1885 of Handbuch der Gletscherkunde.

Sohm Glacier

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Somers Glacier

Somers Glacier is a glacier flowing northwest into Trooz Glacier on Kiev Peninsula, the west coast of Graham Land. First charted by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, 1934-37. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for Henri Somers, chief engineer of the BelgAE's ship Belgica, which explored in the area in 1897-99.

Remus Glacier is a glacier, 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, which flows from the north slopes of Mount Lupa northwestward along the northeast side of the Blackwall Mountains into Providence Cove, Neny Fjord, on the west coast of Graham Land. The lower reaches of the glacier were first roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Resurveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), who so named it for its association with Romulus Glacier, whose head lies near the head of this glacier.

Mount Lupa is a flat-topped, ice-covered mountain, over 1,625 metres (5,330 ft) high, standing between Romulus Glacier and Martin Glacier close east-southeast of Black Thumb and 5 nautical miles (9 km) east of the head of Rymill Bay, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was first roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill. It was resurveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey who applied the name. This mountain lies near the heads of Romulus and Remus Glaciers, and the name derives from the mythological story of the she-wolf (Lupa) which fed the twins Romulus and Remus after they had been thrown into the Tiber.

Lever Glacier glacier in Antarctica

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Clarke Glacier (Graham Land) glacier in Antarctica

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