Tibere

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The Tibere was a French experimental rocket for atmospheric reentry tests. The three-stage Tibere was started to 23.2.1971 and to 18.3.1972 by Biscarosse within the framework of the program ELECTRE. Here flight altitudes were reached by 159 kilometers. The first stage of the Tibere had similarly as the first stage of the Berenice 4 stabilization rockets. The Tibere possessed a takeoff thrust of 170 kN, a startmass of 4500 kg, a diameter of 0,56 m and a length of 14,50 m.

Rocket Missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine

A rocket is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine. Rocket engine exhaust is formed entirely from propellant carried within the rocket before use. Rocket engines work by action and reaction and push rockets forward simply by expelling their exhaust in the opposite direction at high speed, and can therefore work in the vacuum of space.


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Proton is an expendable launch system used for both commercial and Russian government space launches. The first Proton rocket was launched in 1965. Modern versions of the launch system are still in use as of 2018, making it one of the most successful heavy boosters in the history of spaceflight. All Protons are built at the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center factory in Moscow, transported to the Baikonur Cosmodrome, brought to the launch pad horizontally, and raised into vertical position for launch.

Soyuz (rocket family) Russian and Soviet rocket family

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Sounding rocket Rocket carrying scientific instruments

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Tsiolkovsky rocket equation formula

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S-Series (rocket family)

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Saturn V American human-rated expendable rocket

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Delta M

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The Star is a family of American solid-fuel rocket motors used by many space propulsion and launch vehicle stages. It is used almost exclusively as an upper stage.

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OneSpace or One Space Technology Group is a Chinese private space launch group based in Beijing,subsidiaries in Chongqing, Shenzhen and Xi'an. OneSpace was founded in 2015. OneSpace is led by CEO Shu Chang, and is targeting the small launcher market for microsatellites and nanosatellites. OneSpace launched China's first private rocket in 2018.