Tiberianus

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Tiberianus was a 2nd-century Roman politician. The Byzantine chronicler Johannes Malalas (ed. Dindorf, p. 273) speaks of him as governor of the first province of Palestine (ἡγεμὼν τοῦ πρώτου Παλαιστίνων ἔθνους), in connection with the sojourn of Hadrian in Antioch (114). A similar notice may be found in Johannes Antiochenus (In Müller, "Fragmenta Historicorum Græcorum," iv. 580, No. 111) and in Suda, s.v. Τραϊανός. The designation "Palestina prima," which came into use in the middle of the fourth century, gives a historical character to this notice. These authors use a later designation for the earlier period.

Byzantine Empire Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire or Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople. It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural and military force in Europe. "Byzantine Empire" is a term created after the end of the realm; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire, or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".

John Malalas, was a Greek chronicler from Antioch.

Judea (Roman province) Roman province

The Roman province of Judea, sometimes spelled in its original Latin forms of Iudæa or Iudaea to distinguish it from the geographical region of Judea, incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Judea. It was named after Herod Archelaus's Tetrarchy of Judea, but the Roman province encompassed a much larger territory. The name "Judea" was derived from the Kingdom of Judah of the 6th century BCE.

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The Jewish Encyclopedia: A Descriptive Record of the History, Religion, Literature, and Customs of the Jewish People from the Earliest Times to the Present Day is an English-language encyclopedia containing over 15,000 articles on the history, culture, and state of Judaism up to the early-20th century. The encyclopedia's managing editor was Isidore Singer and the editorial board was chaired by Isaac K. Funk and Frank H. Vizetelly.