Tiberias Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

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Tiberias Subdistrict
قضاء طبريا
נפת טבריה
Subdistrict of Mandatory Palestine
1920–1948
Tiberias in Palestine 1920-1948.png
Capital Tiberias
History 
 Established
1920
 Disestablished
1948
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Ottoman flag.svg Acre Sanjak
Northern District (Israel) Flag of Israel.svg
Today part of Israel

The Tiberias Subdistrict (Arabic : قضاء طبريا, Hebrew : נפת טבריה) was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was situated around the city of Tiberias.

In 1945 it was part of Galilee District.

According to the 1947 Partition Plan, the Subdistrict was to lie entirely in the Jewish State. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, small amounts of the territory south and east of the Sea of Galilee were conquered by the Syrian Army and became a No Man's land, while most (nearly 90%) of the subdistrict became the modern-day Kinneret County in the Northern District (Israel).

Borders

Depopulated towns and villages

Official population statistics for the sub-district, from Village Statistics, 1945. 1945 Palestine Mandate Village Statistics population page for Sub-District of Tiberias.jpg
Official population statistics for the sub-district, from Village Statistics, 1945.

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