Tiberiopolis

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Tiberiopolis
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Coordinates 37°54′N31°55′E / 37.900°N 31.917°E / 37.900; 31.917

Tiberiopolis (Ancient Greek : Τιβεριούπολις; sometimes in sources, Tiberiapolis, and Pappa-Tiberiopolis; formerly Pappa) [1] [2] was a town in the Roman province of Phrygia Pacatiana, mentioned by Ptolemy, [3] Socrates of Constantinople [4] and Hierocles. [5] At various times, it was considered as part of Phrygia, Isauria, and the late Roman province of Pisidia. [6]

Contents

It struck its own coins at least from the time of Trajan.

Roman Sarcophagus (2nd C AD) Roman Sarcophagus (6526103787).jpg
Roman Sarcophagus (2nd C AD)

It was situated at the modern village of Yunuslar, Beyşehir district, in Konya Province, Turkey. [2] At Tiberiopolis the famous Roman sarcophagus showing the Twelve Labours of Hercules now displayed at the Konya Archaeological Museum was recovered. [2]

It must have been Christianised at an early date. Nicephorus, a presbyter at Tiberiopolis was martyred in 361 or 362, and later cannonised. [7] His feast is celebrated on 28 November. [7]

Bishopric

Tiberiopolis

The bishopric of Tiberiopolis appears in the oldest Greek Notitiae episcopatuum among the suffragans of Laodicea in Phrygia, capital and metropolitan see of the late Roman province of Phrygia Pacatiana, but in the 8th century it was attached to Hierapolis in Phrygia, capital and metropolitan see of Phrygia Pacatiana Secunda, and as such appears in the Notitiae episcopatuum of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople until the 13th century, when the area was overrun by the Seljuk Turks.

Bishops

Le Quien [8] mentions five of its bishops known by their presence at councils:

Roman Catholic titular see

Tiberiopolis remains a titular see in the Roman Catholic Church. [9] Titular bishops have been: [9]

Pappa

Under the name of Pappa, the town was also a bishopric of the province of Pisidia, and later a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church. [10]

Notes

  1. Richard Talbert , Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World , ( ISBN   0-691-03169-X ), Map 65.
  2. 1 2 3 "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 2017-06-11.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. V, 2, 25.
  4. Hist. eccl., VII, 46.
  5. Synecdemus , 668, 9.
  6. Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.
  7. 1 2 "St. Nicephorus, Presbyter, at Tiberiopolis - Catholic Online". www.catholic.org. Retrieved 2016-08-14.
  8. Oriens christianus, I, 797.
  9. 1 2 Catholic Hierarchy
  10. Catholic Hierarchy

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References

Attribution