Tiberius Claudius Cleobulus

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Tiberius Claudius Cleobulus (c.165–c.213 AD) was a Roman senator who held the position of suffect consul for one nundinium around 210 AD. [1] [2]

Claudius was the son of an earlier Tiberius Claudius Cleobulus (c.135-c.180) and Acilia, the daughter of Manius Acilius Glabrio Gnaeus Cornelius Severus. He married his cousin, Acilia Frestana, who was the daughter of Manius Acilius Glabrio, consul in 186, and niece of Acilia. Claudius and Acilia Festana together had Claudia Acilia Priscilliana, who would later marry Lucius Valerius Messalla. [2] [3] He also had a son, Claudius Acilius Cleobulus.

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References

  1. Mennen 2011, p. 85.
  2. 1 2 Dondin-Payre 1993, p. 168.
  3. Lehmann & Holum 2000, p. 51.

Bibliography