Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (consul 238 BC)

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Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Gracchus (fl. 237 BC; dead by 215 BC), a Roman Republican consul in the year 238 BC, was the first man from his branch ( stirps ) of the family (the gens Sempronia) to become consul; several other plebeian Sempronii had already reached the consulship and even the censorship. He is best known as the father of the similarly named consul of 215 and 213 BC, and the great-grandfather of the Brothers Gracchi (Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus).

Contents

Tiberius Gracchus had a relatively undistinguished consulship, with an indecisive campaign in Sardinia (Livy), after which he apparently vowed to dedicate a temple, not completed in his lifetime. That temple was completed and dedicated by his elder son, Tiberius, the consul of 215 BC and 213 BC.

His co-consul, the patrician consul, was Publius Valerius Q. f. Falto.

Family and descendants

Tiberius Gracchus was the father of at least two sons by an unknown wife:

Other possible descendants

See also

Sources

Political offices
Preceded by
Gaius Mamilius Turrinus and Quintus Valerius Falto
Consul of the Roman Republic
with Publius Valerius Falto
238 BC
Succeeded by
Lucius Cornelius Lentulus Caudinus and Quintus Fulvius Flaccus

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