Tiberius Sempronius Longus

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Tiberius Sempronius Longus may refer to:

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210 BC Year

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Publius Cornelius Scipio general and statesman of the Roman Republic

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Battle of the Trebia first major battle of the Second Punic War

The Battle of the Trebia was the first major battle of the Second Punic War, fought between the Carthaginian forces of Hannibal and the Roman Republic in December of 218 BC, on or around the winter solstice. It was a resounding Roman defeat with heavy losses, with only about 10,000 out of 40,000 Romans surviving and retreating to Placentia (Piacenza). In this battle, Hannibal got the better of the Romans by exercising the careful and innovative planning for which he was famous. The impetuous and short-sighted opposing general, the consul Tiberius Sempronius Longus, allowed himself to be provoked into a frontal assault under physically difficult circumstances and failed to see that he was being led into a trap.

Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus may refer to:

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Battle of Placentia (194 BC)

The Battle of Placentia was fought in 194 BC, near Placentia, between the Roman Republic and the Boii. The Roman army won the battle. The following year, another battle with the Boii would take place in the same region; known as the Battle of Mutina, it would end the Boii threat.

Tiberius Sempronius Longus was a Roman consul during the Second Punic War and a contemporary of Publius Cornelius Scipio. In 218 BC, Sempronius was sent to Africa with 160 quinqueremes to gather forces and supplies, while Scipio was sent to Iberia to intercept Hannibal. It was at this time, striking from Lilybaeum, on the island of Sicily, that Sempronius Longus captured Malta from the Carthaginians.

Tiberius Sempronius Longus was a Roman consul in 194 BC, and a contemporary of Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus. He was the son of the Tiberius Sempronius Longus who commanded Roman legions during the Second Punic War.

Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus was a Roman politician of the 2nd century BC. He served as consul twice, in 177 and 163 BC. Tiberius is also noteworthy as the father of the two famous 'Gracchi' popularis reformers, Tiberius and Gaius.

Sempronia (gens) families from Ancient Rome who shared the Sempronius nomen

The gens Sempronia was a Roman family of great antiquity. It included both patrician and plebeian branches. The first of the Sempronii to obtain the consulship was Aulus Sempronius Atratinus, in 497 BC, the twelfth year of the Republic. The patrician Sempronii frequently obtained the highest offices of the state in the early centuries of the Republic, but they were eclipsed by the plebeian families of the gens at the end of the fourth century BC. The glory of the Sempronia gens is confined to the Republican period. Very few persons of this name, and none of them of any importance, are mentioned under the Empire.

Tiberius Sempronius Ti. f. Ti. n. Gracchus was a Roman Republican consul in the Second Punic War. He was son of Tiberius Sempronius Ti. f. Gracchus, who was apparently the first man from his branch of the family to become a consul.

Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Gracchus, a Roman Republican consul in the year 238 BC, was the first man from his branch (stirps) of the family to become consul; several other plebeian Sempronii had already reached the consulship and even the censorship. He is best known as the father of the similarly named consul of 215 and 213 BC, and the grandfather of Tiberius Gracchus Major, and the great-grandfather of the Brothers Gracchi.

Titus Annius Luscus was the name of several ancient Roman men of the plebeian gens Annia, including:

Gaius Atinius served as military tribune in Gaul under the consul Tiberius Sempronius Longus in 194 BC. He is probably the same Gaius Atinius who served as praetor in 188, and received Hispania Ulterior as his province. He remained there as propraetor, defeating the Lusitani, before being killed during the siege of Hasta in 186 BC.

The gens Atinia was a plebeian family at Rome. None of the members of this gens ever attained the consulship; and the first who held any of the higher offices of the state was Gaius Atinius Labeo, who was praetor in 195 BC.

Lucius Postumius Albinus may refer to: