Tibiofibular ligament

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Tibiofibular ligament may refer to:

Anterior tibiofibular ligament

The anterior ligament of the lateral malleolus is a flat, triangular band of fibers, broader below than above, which extends obliquely downward and lateralward between the adjacent margins of the tibia and fibula, on the front aspect of the syndesmosis.

Interosseous membrane of leg

The interosseous membrane of the leg extends between the interosseous crests of the tibia and fibula, helps stabilize the Tib-Fib relationship and separates the muscles on the front from those on the back of the leg.

Posterior tibiofibular ligament

The posterior ligament of the lateral malleolus. It is smaller than the anterior ligament of the lateral malleolus and is disposed in a similar manner on the posterior surface of the syndesmosis. It connects the tibia and fibular on the inferior part of both bones.

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Tibia larger of the two bones of the leg below the knee for vertebrates

The tibia, also known as the shinbone or shankbone, is the larger, stronger, and anterior (frontal) of the two bones in the leg below the knee in vertebrates, and it connects the knee with the ankle bones. The tibia is found on the medial side of the leg next to the fibula and closer to the median plane or centre-line. The tibia is connected to the fibula by the interosseous membrane of the leg, forming a type of fibrous joint called a syndesmosis with very little movement. The tibia is named for the flute tibia. It is the second largest bone in the human body next to the femur. The leg bones are the strongest long bones as they support the rest of the body.

Fibula bone of the leg

The fibula or calf bone is a leg bone located on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below. It is the smaller of the two bones and in proportion to its length, the slenderest of all the long bones. Its upper extremity is small, placed toward the back of the head of the tibia, below the level of the knee joint, and excluded from the formation of this joint. Its lower extremity inclines a little forward, so as to be on a plane anterior to that of the upper end; it projects below the tibia, and forms the lateral part of the ankle-joint.

Ankle region where the foot and the leg meet

The ankle, or the talocrural region, is the region where the foot and the leg meet. The ankle includes three joints: the ankle joint proper or talocrural joint, the subtalar joint, and the inferior tibiofibular joint. The movements produced at this joint are dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the foot. In common usage, the term ankle refers exclusively to the ankle region. In medical terminology, "ankle" can refer broadly to the region or specifically to the talocrural joint.

Pott's fracture, also known as Pott's syndrome I and Dupuytren fracture, is an archaic term loosely applied to a variety of bimalleolar ankle fractures. The injury is caused by a combined abduction external rotation from an eversion force. This action strains the sturdy medial (deltoid) ligament of the ankle, often tearing off the medial malleolus due to its strong attachment. The talus then moves laterally, shearing off the lateral malleolus or, more commonly, breaking the fibula superior to the tibiofibular syndesmosis. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also sheared off by the talus. A fractured fibula in addition to detaching the medial malleolus will tear the tibiofibular syndesmosis. The combined fracture of the medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, and the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is known as a "trimalleolar fracture".

Maisonneuve fracture

The Maisonneuve fracture is a spiral fracture of the proximal third of the fibula associated with a tear of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis and the interosseous membrane. There is an associated fracture of the medial malleolus or rupture of the deep deltoid ligament. This type of injury can be difficult to detect.

Lateral meniscus

The lateral meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous band that spans the lateral side of the interior of the knee joint. It is one of two menisci of the knee, the other being the medial meniscus. It is nearly circular and covers a larger portion of the articular surface than the medial. It can occasionally be injured or torn by twisting the knee or applying direct force, as seen in contact sports.

Stifle joint

The stifle joint is a complex joint in the hind limbs of quadruped mammals such as the sheep, horse or dog. It is the equivalent of the human knee and is often the largest synovial joint in the animal's body. The stifle joint joins three bones: the femur, patella, and tibia. The joint consists of three smaller ones: the femoropatellar joint, medial femorotibial joint, and lateral femorotibial joint.

A transverse ligament is a ligament on a transverse plane, orthogonal to the anteroposterior or oral-aboral axiscan of the body.

Inferior transverse ligament can refer to:

Inferior tibiofibular joint

The distal tibiofibular joint is formed by the rough, convex surface of the medial side of the distal end of the fibula, and a rough concave surface on the lateral side of the tibia.

Superior tibiofibular joint

The proximal tibiofibular articulation is an arthrodial joint between the lateral condyle of the tibia and the head of the fibula.

Fibrous joint

Fibrous joints are connected by dense connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen. These are fixed joints where bones are united by a layer of white fibrous tissue of varying thickness. In the skull the joints between the bones are called sutures. Such immovable joints are also referred to as synarthroses.

Transverse ligament of knee

The transverse or [anterior] meniscomeniscal ligament is a ligament in the knee joint that connects the anterior convex margin of the lateral meniscus to the anterior end of the medial meniscus.

Anterior ligament of the head of the fibula

The anterior ligament of the head of the fibula consists of two or three broad and flat bands, which pass obliquely upward from the front of the head of the fibula to the front of the lateral condyle of the tibia.

Le Fort's fracture of the ankle is a vertical fracture of the antero-medial part of the distal fibula with avulsion of the anterior tibiofibular ligament, opposite to a Tillaux-Chaput avulsion fracture

Danis–Weber classification

The Danis–Weber classification is a method of describing ankle fractures. It has three categories:

Tillaux fracture


A Tillaux fracture is a Salter–Harris type III fracture through the anterolateral aspect of the distal tibial epiphysis. It occurs in older adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 when the medial epiphysis had closed but before the lateral side has done so, due to an avulsion of the anterior tibiofibular ligament, at the opposite end to a Wagstaffe-Le Fort avulsion fracture