Ticelia

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Ticelia was a supposed city and diocese, in Cyrenaica. The article by Siméon Vailhé in the 1912 Catholic Encyclopedia expressed perplexity about its identity or existence. [1] The supposed bishopric is not accepted into the Catholic Church's list of titular sees. [2]

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References

  1. Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Ticelia"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2013, ISBN   978-88-209-9070-1), p. 989