Tickell Head

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Tickell Head ( 60°32′S45°48′W / 60.533°S 45.800°W / -60.533; -45.800 Coordinates: 60°32′S45°48′W / 60.533°S 45.800°W / -60.533; -45.800 ) is a headland forming the east side of Bridger Bay on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. First seen in December 1821 in the course of the joint cruise by Captain Nathaniel Palmer, American sealer, and Captain George Powell, British sealer. Surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1956-58 and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for William L.N. Tickell, FIDS meteorologist at Signy Island in 1955 and leader at that station in 1956.

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Signy Island is a small subantarctic island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was named by the Norwegian whaler Petter Sørlle (1884–1933) after his wife, Signy Therese.

The Trojan Range is a mountain range rising to 2,760 metres (9,055 ft), extending northward from Mount Francais along the east side of Iliad Glacier, Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of the British Antarctic Territory. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955 and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for the Trojans, one of the opposing sides in the Trojan War in Homer's Iliad.

Iceberg Bay is a bay 3 miles (5 km) wide, which indents the south coast of Coronation Island between Cape Hansen and Olivine Point, in the South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. It was named by Matthew Brisbane, who roughly charted the south coast of Coronation Island under the direction of James Weddell in 1823. Beaufoy Ridge and Sunshine Glacier lie close north of Iceberg Bay.

McFarlane Strait McFarlane Strait

McFarlane Strait is a strait lying between Greenwich Island and Livingston Island, in the South Shetland Islands off Antarctica. It is 24 kilometres (13 nmi) long and 3 kilometres (1.6 nmi) wide. The name appears on an 1822 chart by Captain George Powell, a British sealer, and is now well established in international usage.

Cape Bidlingmaier is a rocky cape at the east side of the entrance to Mechanics Bay, on the north side of Heard Island in the southern Indian Ocean. The feature appears to have been known to American sealers as Morgan's Point, as shown by Captain H.C. Chester's 1860 sketch map of the island. The name Negros Head was also in use by American sealers during the 1860–70 period. The name Bidlingmaier was applied by the First German Antarctica Expedition, under Erich von Drygalski, who made a running survey and landing along the north side of the island in 1902. Friedrich Bidlingmaier served as magnetician and meteorologist with the expedition.

Bridger Bay is a semi-circular bay 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) wide, lying west of Tickell Head along the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was discovered in 1821 in the course of the joint cruise by Captain Nathaniel Palmer, an American sealer, and Captain George Powell, a British sealer. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1956–58 and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for John F.D. Bridger, who participated in the survey of Coronation Island and Signy Island.

Oberon Peak is an isolated nunatak, rising to about 1,250 m, at the head of Uranus Glacier and 8 nautical miles (15 km) north-northwest of Titania Peak in central Alexander Island, Antarctica. First mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1960. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for its association with nearby Uranus Glacier, Oberon being one of the satellites of Uranus.

Whitecloud Glacier

Whitecloud Glacier is a glacier which flows northward between Klokotnitsa Ridge on the east and Tsarevets Buttress on the west to discharge into Charcot Bay just west of Almond Point, Trinity Peninsula. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1960. The name is descriptive of cloud conditions that prevailed at the time of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) survey of the area in 1948.

Crown Head is a headland forming the east side of Palmer Bay on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was first seen in the course of the joint cruise by Captain George Powell, a British sealer, and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, an American sealer, in December 1821. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1956–58. The name derives from an association with Coronation Island and was given by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959.

Purdy Point is a point 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east-southeast of Foul Point on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. First seen in December 1821 in the course of a joint cruise by Captain George Powell, British sealer, and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, American sealer, and roughly shown on Powell's chart. Surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1956-58 and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for John Purdy (1773–1843), a leading English hydrographer of his day, who compiled numerous nautical directories and charts, including the South Orkney Islands, the forerunners of Admiralty sailing directions.

Palmer Bay is a bay 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) wide, lying immediately west of Crown Head on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. Discovered in December 1821 in the course of a joint cruise by Captain George Powell, a British sealer in the sloop Dove and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, an American sealer in the sloop James Monroe. Named for Captain Palmer.

Findlay Point is a point 2 nautical miles (4 km) northwest of Palmer Bay on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was first seen in December 1821 in the course of the joint cruise by Captain George Powell, British sealer, and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, American sealer, and roughly charted by Powell. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1956–58 and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Alexander George Findlay, an English geographer and hydrographer who compiled a long series of nautical directories and charts, including the South Orkney Islands.

Foul Point on Yordanov Island lies at the east side of the entrance to Ommanney Bay on the north side of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was discovered in December 1821 in the course of the joint cruise by Captain George Powell, British sealer, and Captain Nathaniel Palmer, American sealer. The name first appears on Powell's chart, published in 1822. It is basically an area of coastal ice-free terrain with large seabird colonies and lichen-dominated cliffs, and permanent ice rising to the Brisbane Heights plateau which provides an excellent representative area of a pristine ice environment near the northern limit of the maritime Antarctic

Mossman Inlet is a narrow ice-filled inlet which recedes north 19 kilometres (10 nmi) between Cape Kidson and the southwest end of Kemp Peninsula, along the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. This inlet was first seen and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the United States Antarctic Service, and during 1947 it was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) charted it from the ground. It was named by the FIDS for British meteorologist and climatologist Robert C. Mossman, 1870–1940, a member of the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, 1902–04.

Cape Hartree is a cape which forms the southwestern tip of Mossman Peninsula on the south coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands. To the west of Cape Hartree lie Buchan Bay and Cape Murdoch.

Marshall Peak is a peak, 1,205 metres (3,950 ft) high, which is ice-covered except for its rocky northeast side, standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) northwest of the head of Palmer Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. This coast was first explored in 1940 by members of the United States Antarctic Service, but the peak was first charted by a joint party consisting of members of the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition and the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1947. It was named by the FIDS for Norman B. Marshall, a zoologist at the FIDS Hope Bay base in 1945–46.

Herbert Plateau is a portion of the central plateau of Graham Land, Antarctica, lying between Blériot Glacier and Drygalski Glacier. It borders Foster Plateau on the south and Detroit Plateau on the north. The feature was photographed by the Falkland Islands and Dependencies Aerial Survey Expedition in 1956–57 and mapped from these photos by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1960 for Walter W. Herbert, a FIDS assistant surveyor at the Hope Bay station in 1956 and 1957.

Matthews Island

Matthews Island is the largest of the Robertson Islands in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It lies immediately south-east of Coronation Island, from which it is separated by a narrow channel known as the Divide. Matthews Island was mapped as part of Coronation Island until January 1957 when a Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) party established its insularity. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Drummond H. Matthews, a FIDS geologist at Signy Island in 1956.

Lamina Peak is a prominent pyramid-shaped peak, 1,280 metres (4,200 ft) high, surmounting a stratified ridge which curves down from Mount Edred northeastward toward George VI Sound. The peak stands 4.5 nautical miles (8 km) inland from the east coast of Alexander Island near the southern limit of the Douglas Range. It was first photographed from the air on November 23, 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth and mapped from these photos by W.L.G. Joerg. It was roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition and resurveyed in 1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and was so named by the FIDS because of the marked horizontal stratification of the rocks of this peak.

Ommanney Bay is a bay 2 mi (3.2 km) wide between Prong Point and Foul Point on the north coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. Like much of Coronation Island and its surrounding features, it was first seen and roughly charted by Captain George Powell and Captain Nathaniel Palmer in 1821. It was recharted in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the Discovery II and named for Francis D. Ommanney, zoologist on the staff of the Discovery Committee.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Tickell Head".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg