Tidaá Mixtec

Last updated
Tidaá Mixtec
(San Pedro Tidaá)
North Central Nochixtlán Mixtec
Native to Mexico
Region Oaxaca
Native speakers
380 (2000) [1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 mtx
Glottolog tida1235 [2]

Tidaá Mixtec is a moribund Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec.

Mixtec language included into Mixtecan languages

The Mixtec languages belong to the Otomanguean language family of Mexico, and are closely related to the Trique and Cuicatec languages, together with which they form the Mixtecan branch of the family. They are spoken by over half a million people. Identifying how many Mixtec languages there are in this complex dialect continuum poses challenges at the level of linguistic theory. Depending on the criteria for distinguishing dialects from languages, there may be as many as fifty Mixtec languages.

Related Research Articles

Mesoamerica, along with Mesopotamia and China, is among the three known places in the world where writing has developed independently. Mesoamerican scripts deciphered to date are a combination of logographic and syllabic values. They are often called hieroglyphs due to the iconic shapes of many of the glyphs, a pattern superficially similar to Egyptian hieroglyphs. Five or six scripts have been documented in Mesoamerica, but the limits of archaeological dating methods make it difficult to establish which was earliest and hence the forebearer from which the others developed. The best documented and deciphered Mesoamerican writing system, and the most widely known, is the classic Maya script. An extensive Mesoamerican literature has been conserved partly in indigenous scripts and partly in the postconquest transcriptions in the Latin script.

Mixtec writing

Mixtec writing originated as a logographic writing system during the Post-Classic period in Mesoamerican history. Records of genealogy, historic events, and myths are found in the pre-Columbian Mixtec codices. The arrival of Europeans in 1520 AD caused changes in form, style, and the function of the Mixtec writings. Today these codices and other Mixtec writings are used as a source of ethnographic, linguistic, and historical information for scholars, and help to preserve the identity of the Mixtec people as migration and globalization introduce new cultural influences.

La Mixteca is a cultural, economic and political region in Western Oaxaca and neighboring portions of Puebla, Guerrero in south-central Mexico, which refers to the home of the Mixtec people. In their languages, the region is called either Ñuu Djau, Ñuu Davi or Ñuu Savi. Two-thirds of all Mixtecs live in the region, and the entire national population of Mixtecs in Mexico was 500,000 in 1999.

Silacayoapan is one of the more extensive Mixtec languages. It is spoken by 150,000 people in Puebla and across the border in Guerrero, as well as by emigrants to the United States.

Nuyoo Mixtec, also known as Southwestern Tlaxiaco Mixtec, is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec, but its greatest degree of intelligibility is with Atatláhuca Mixtec.

Tilantongo (Diuxi-Tilantongo) Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec. Numbers are declining due to emigration to the United States.

Apoala Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec.

Cacaloxtepec Mixtec, also Huajuapan Mixtec, is a Mixtec language spoken in the town of Santiago Cacaloxtepec in Oaxaca. It is most intelligible with Silacayoapan Mixtec.

Coatzospan Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca spoken in the town of San Juan Coatzospan.

Chayuco-Jamiltepec Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca, spoken in the towns of San Agustín Chayuco, Santa Catarina Mechoacán, Santiago Jamiltepec, San Andrés Huaxpaltepec, Santa María Huazolotitlán, Santiago Tetepec, and Santa Elena Comaltepec.

Zacatepec Mixtec, or Tacuate, is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is spoken in the town of Santa María Zacatepec and other towns in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Amoltepec Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec.

Tututepec Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca, spoken in Santa María Acatepec, Santa Cruz Tututepec, San Pedro Tututepec and other towns. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec.

(Magdalena) Peñasco Mixtec, also known as Tlacotepec Mixtec, is a Mixtec language of Oaxaca spoken in the towns of Santa María Magdalena Peñasco, San Cristobal Amoltepec, San Mateo Peñasco, and San Agustín Tlacotepec. It has closer unidirectional intelligibility with other varieties, but may be closest to Ñumí Mixtec.

Ayutla Mixtec is a Mixtec language of Guerrero. It's divergent, with a number of words unlike other varieties of Mixtec.

Ñumí Mixtec is a diverse Mixtec language of Oaxaca. It may be closest to Peñasco Mixtec.

Mixtepec Mixtec is a Mixtec language spoken in the town of San Juan Mixtepec, Oaxaca, and in nearby towns, and by emigrants in California. It is not close to other varieties of Mixtec.

Southern Puebla Mixtec, denominated by INALI as Puebla-Oaxaca borderline Mixtec, and also known as Acatlán Mixtec, is a Mixtec language of Puebla and Oaxaca State in Mexico. It is spoken in the towns of Acatlán, Xayacatlán de Bravo, San Jerónimo Xayacatlán, Petlalcingo, and Zapotitlán Palmas.

References

  1. Tidaá Mixtec at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Tidaa Mixtec". Glottolog 3.0 . Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.