Tidal (disambiguation)

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Tidal is the adjectival form of the word tide.

Tidal may also refer to:

<i>Tidal</i> (album) 1996 studio album by Fiona Apple

Tidal is the debut studio album by American singer-songwriter Fiona Apple, released on July 23, 1996 by Work Records and Columbia Records. Tidal produced six singles: "Shadowboxer", "Slow Like Honey", "Sleep to Dream", "The First Taste", "Criminal" and "Never Is a Promise". "Criminal", the album's most popular single, won a Grammy Award for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" in 1998. In 2017, Tidal got its first vinyl run as a 'Vinyl Me, Please' exclusive "Record of the Month."

Tidal, king of Goyim, is a monarch mentioned in Genesis 14:1. Genesis describes Tidal as one of the four kings who fought Abraham in the Battle of Siddim.

Tidal (service) subscription-based music streaming service

Tidal is a subscription-based music, podcast and video streaming service that combines lossless audio and high-definition music videos with exclusive content and special features on music. The service is maintained by the Norwegian company Aspiro AB.

See also

The tidal force is an apparent force that stretches a body towards and away from the center of mass of another body due to a gradient in gravitational field from the other body; it is responsible for diverse phenomena, including tides, tidal locking, breaking apart of celestial bodies and formation of ring systems within Roche limit, and in extreme cases, spaghettification of objects. It arises because the gravitational field exerted on one body by another is not constant across its parts: the nearest side is attracted more strongly than the farthest side. It is this difference that causes a body to get stretched. Thus, the tidal force is also known as the differential force, as well as a secondary effect of the gravitational field.

A tide is the rise and fall of a sea level caused by the Moon's gravity and other factors.

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Beach Area of loose particles at the edge of the sea or other body of water

A beach is a landform alongside a body of water which consists of loose particles. The particles composing a beach are typically made from rock, such as sand, gravel, shingle, pebbles. The particles can also be biological in origin, such as mollusc shells or coralline algae.

Bay of Fundy A bay on the east coast of North America between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

The Bay of Fundy is a bay between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the US state of Maine. It has an extremely high tidal range.

Tidal River (Victoria) perennial river of the West Gippsland catchment, located in the Wilsons Promontory region of the Australian state of Victoria

The Tidal River is a perennial river of the West Gippsland catchment, located in the Wilsons Promontory region of the Australian state of Victoria. A permanent camping ground, which flows past the camping ground to the north, is also called Tidal River.

Rip tide is a strong tidal flow of water within estuaries and other enclosed tidal areas.

A riptide is a strong, offshore current that is caused by the tide pulling water through an inlet along a barrier beach, at a lagoon or inland marina where tide water flows steadily out to sea during ebb tide. It is a strong tidal flow of water within estuaries and other enclosed tidal areas. The riptides become the strongest where the flow is constricted. When there is a falling or ebbing tide, the outflow water is strongly flowing through an inlet toward the sea, especially once stabilized by jetties. During these falling and ebbing tides, a riptide can carry a person far offshore. For example, the ebbing tide at Shinnecock Inlet in Southampton, New York, extends more than 300 metres (980 ft) offshore. Because of this, riptides are typically more powerful than rip currents.

Tidal power Technology to convert the energy from tides into useful forms of power

Tidal power or tidal energy is a form of hydropower that converts the energy obtained from tides into useful forms of power, mainly electricity.

Menai Strait strait in the Wales, between Anglesey and Gwynedd

The Menai Strait is a narrow stretch of shallow tidal water about 25 km (16 mi) long, which separates the island of Anglesey from the mainland of Wales.

Slack water, also known as 'the stand of the tide', is a short period in a body of tidal water when the water is completely unstressed, and there is no movement either way in the tidal stream, and which occurs before the direction of the tidal stream reverses. Slack water can be estimated using a tidal atlas or the tidal diamond information on a nautical chart. The time of slack water, particularly in constricted waters, does not occur at high and low water, and in certain areas, such as Primera Angostura, the ebb may run for up to three hours after the water level has started to rise, and the flood may run for three hours after the water has started to fall. Thornton Lecky, writing in 1884, illustrates the phenomenon with an inland basin of infinite size, connected to the sea by a narrow mouth. Since the level of the basin is always at mean sea level, the flood in the mouth starts at half tide, and its velocity is at its greatest at the time of high water, with the strongest ebb occurring conversely at low water.

Skookumchuck Narrows A strait forming the entrance of Sechelt Inlet on British Columbias Sunshine Coast in Canada

Skookumchuck Narrows is a strait forming the entrance of Sechelt Inlet on British Columbia's Sunshine Coast in Canada. Before broadening into Sechelt Inlet, all of its tidal flow together with that of Salmon Inlet and Narrows Inlet must pass through Sechelt Rapids. At peak flows, whitecaps and whirlpools form at the rapids even in calm weather. The narrows are also the site of a Skookumchuk Narrows Provincial Park.

Fishing weir

A fishing weir, fish weir, fishgarth or kiddle is an obstruction placed in tidal waters, or wholly or partially across a river, to direct the passage of, or trap fish. A weir may be used to trap marine fish in the intertidal zone as the tide recedes, fish such as salmon as they attempt to swim upstream to breed in a river, or eels as they migrate downstream. Alternatively, fish weirs can be used to channel fish to a particular location, such as to a fish ladder. Weirs were traditionally built from wood or stones. The use of fishing weirs as fish traps probably dates back prior to the emergence of modern humans, and have since been used by many societies across the world.

Tidal Basin lake in Washington, D.C.

The Tidal Basin is a partially man-made reservoir between the Potomac River and the Washington Channel in Washington, D.C. It is part of West Potomac Park and is a focal point of the National Cherry Blossom Festival held each spring. The Jefferson Memorial, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, and the George Mason Memorial are situated adjacent to the Tidal Basin. The basin covers an area of about 107 acres (43 ha) and is 10 feet (3.0 m) deep.

Tidal range is the height difference between high tide and low tide. Tides are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by gravitational forces exerted by the Moon and Sun and the rotation of Earth. Tidal range is not constant but changes depending on the locations of the Moon and Sun.

A tidal river is a river whose flow and level are influenced by tides. A section of a larger river affected by the tides is a tidal reach, although it may sometimes be considered a tidal river if it has been given a separate name. The Brisbane River, which flows into the Pacific Ocean from the east coast of Australia, is also a tidal river.

A proxigean spring tide is a tide that occurs three or four times per year when the Moon's perigee coincides with a spring tide. This tide usually adds only a couple of inches to normal spring tides.

Theory of tides The science of interpretation and prediction of deformations of astronomical bodies and their atmospheres and oceans under the gravitational loading of other astronomical bodies

The theory of tides is the application of continuum mechanics to interpret and predict the tidal deformations of planetary and satellite bodies and their atmospheres and oceans under the gravitational loading of another astronomical body or bodies.

Head of tide The farthest point upstream where a river is affected by tidal fluctuations

Head of tide or tidal limit is the farthest point upstream where a river is affected by tidal fluctuations, or where the fluctuations are less than a certain amount. This applies to rivers which flow into tidal bodies such as oceans, bays and deltas.

King tide A colloquial term for an especially high spring tide, such as a perigean spring tide.

"King tide" is a colloquial term for an especially high spring tide, such as a perigean spring tide. "King tide" is not a scientific term, nor is it used in a scientific context. The use of the term "king tide" originated in Australia, New Zealand and other Pacific nations to refer to an especially high tide that occurs only a few times per year. The term has now come to be used in North America as well, particularly in low-lying South Florida, where they cause sunny day tidal flooding.

Malibu Rapids (British Columbia) river in Canada

The Malibu Rapids forms the entrance to Princess Louisa Inlet and is also connected to the Jervis Inlet. The tidal flow of both inlets pass through this narrow and shallow passage that creates a fast moving and strong tidal rapids during the peak flows. At slack tide, the entrance is virtually flat calm similar to the Skookumchuck Narrows near the entrance of the Jervis Inlet.

Trent Aegir A tidal bore on the River Trent in England

The Trent Aegir, also known as the Eagre, is a tidal bore on the River Trent in England. At certain times of the year, the lower tidal reaches of the Trent experience a moderately large bore. It is said to take its name from Ægir, the Norse god of the ocean, although this is disputed. A more likely derivation is from Old English *ēagor.