Tidal (king)

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Tidal
King of Goiim
House Goiim [1]

Tidal (Hebrew : תִדְעָל, Modern  Tid'al, Tiberian  Ṯīḏe‘āl, Ancient Ṯīḏeġāl), king of Goyim, is a monarch mentioned in Genesis 14:1. Genesis describes Tidal as one of the four kings who fought Abraham in the Battle of Siddim.

Hebrew language Semitic language native to Israel

Hebrew is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel; the modern version of which is spoken by over 9 million people worldwide. Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh. The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE. Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family. Hebrew is the only living Canaanite language left, and the only truly successful example of a revived dead language.

Modern Hebrew language

Modern Hebrew or Israeli Hebrew, generally referred to by speakers simply as Hebrew, is the standard form of the Hebrew language spoken today. Spoken in ancient times, Hebrew, a member of the Canaanite branch of the Semitic language family, was supplanted as the Jewish vernacular by the western dialect of Aramaic beginning in the third century BCE, though it continued to be used as a liturgical and literary language. It was revived as a spoken language in the 19th and 20th centuries and is the official language of Israel.

Tiberian vocalization system of diacritics developed by the Masoretes of Tiberias to specify the pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible, reflecting Hebrew pronunciation of 8th–10th century Judea

The Tiberian vocalization, Tiberian pointing, or Tiberian niqqud is a system of diacritics (niqqud) devised by the Masoretes of Tiberias to add to the consonantal text of the Hebrew Bible to produce the Masoretic Text. The system soon became used to vocalize other Hebrew texts, as well.

Contents

The word goyim in biblical Hebrew can be translated as "nations" or "peoples" or "ethnic groups" (in modern Hebrew it means "Gentiles"), although biblical scholars suggest that in this verse it may instead be a reference to the region of Gutium. [2]

Modern Hebrew is phonetically simpler than Biblical Hebrew and has fewer phonemes, but it is phonologically more complex. It has 25 to 27 consonants and 5 to 10 vowels, depending on the speaker and the analysis.

Theories about the name

Tudhaliya is the name of several Hittite kings:

Hittites ancient Anatolian people who established an empire

The Hittites were an Anatolian people who played an important role in establishing an empire centered on Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia as well as parts of the northern Levant and Upper Mesopotamia.

See also

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References

  1. "Genesis 14 NIV - Abram Rescues Lot - At the time when". Bible Gateway. Retrieved 2015-07-28.
  2. Frank Moore Colby; Talcott Williams (1917). The New International Encyclopædia. Dodd, Mead and Company. p. 264.
  3. Adam Simon van der Woude; Adrianus van Selms (1968). Adhuc Loquitur. E. J. Brill. p. 36.