Tidcombe

Last updated

Tidcombe
St Michael's, Tidcombe - geograph.org.uk - 1436692.jpg
St Michael's, Tidcombe
Wiltshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Tidcombe
Location within Wiltshire
OS grid reference SU290583
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Marlborough
Postcode district SN8
Dialling code 01264
Police Wiltshire
Fire Dorset and Wiltshire
Ambulance South Western
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Wiltshire
51°19′23″N1°35′06″W / 51.323°N 01.585°W / 51.323; -01.585 Coordinates: 51°19′23″N1°35′06″W / 51.323°N 01.585°W / 51.323; -01.585

Tidcombe is a small village in Wiltshire, England, on the eastern edge of the county, near Hampshire. It is about 9 miles (14 km) southeast of Marlborough and 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Hungerford, Berkshire. With few inhabitants, it forms part of the civil parish of Tidcombe and Fosbury, which has a parish meeting. [1]

Contents

History

There is a prehistoric ditch on the slopes of Tidcombe Down, south and southwest of the village; part of the western boundary of the parish follows it. [2] Also on the down is a Neolithic long barrow, 54m long. [3] The eastern boundary of the ancient parish followed the Roman road from Cirencester to Winchester, known in this area as Chute Causeway; on this section, between Marlborough in the northwest and Andover in the southeast, the road deviates south to avoid the dry valleys around Hippenscombe. [4]

Domesday Book of 1086 recorded nine households at Titicome. [5] Tidcombe lay within Savernake Forest until 1330. [4]

Lords of the manor included William Esturmy of Wulfhall (died 1427; MP and Speaker of the House of Commons) and John Seymour (died 1464, also an MP). By 1540 the manor had been acquired by Edward Seymour (brother of queen consort Jane Seymour; later Duke of Somerset and Lord Protector; executed 1552) and it passed to his son Edward Seymour, 1st Earl of Hertford (1539–1621). The manor remained with the Dukes of Somerset, alongside Tottenham until 1675, and was then held by the Seymours alongside Pewsey until sold around 1767 by Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland and his wife Elizabeth (née Seymour) to Edward Tanner (d.1779).

Tidcombe Manor The Manor, Tidcombe - geograph.org.uk - 1436707.jpg
Tidcombe Manor

Tanner's son John (d.1797) was probably the builder of the manor house, near the church. In brick and stone dressings and with a five-bay front, it is now Grade II* listed. [6]

In the 19th century, the names Tidcombe and Titcombe were both in use. [7]

Parish church

There is evidence of a church in the mid 13th century. [4] The present church, in part-rendered flint with stone dressings, is from the 14th century. The nave was re-roofed in the 15th century, and in the 17th the low two-stage west tower was added which necessitated shortening the nave. [8] The north porch, in brick and described by Pevsner as humble [9] carries a date of 1675. The chancel was restored and paved in the 19th century. [8]

Two of the three bells are from the 17th century. [4] The churchyard has a chest tomb of 1770, a memorial to Marie and Jane Tanner; [10] and 19th-century tombs of the Hawkins family of neighbouring Wexcombe. [11] [12] The church was recorded as Grade II* listed in 1966. [8]

The Fosbury tithing was made a separate ecclesiastical parish in 1856 after a church was built there. [4] Hippenscombe, until then extra-parochial, was added to Tidcombe parish in 1879. [13] Fosbury benefice was united with Tidcombe in 1926, although the parishes remained distinct; the incumbent was to live at the Fosbury parsonage. [14] In 1962 the benefice was united with East Grafton. [15] The parish was united with Tidcombe in 1979 [4] and Fosbury church was declared redundant. [16] Today the parish forms part of the Savernake team ministry, alongside eleven other rural churches around Burbage. [17]

Notable residents

George Jellicoe, 2nd Earl Jellicoe, wartime commander of the Special Boat Service and long-serving politician in the House of Lords, lived at Tidcombe Manor in later life until his death in 2007. [18]

Related Research Articles

Tidworth Human settlement in England

Tidworth is a garrison town and civil parish in south-east Wiltshire, England, on the eastern edge of Salisbury Plain. Lying on both sides of the A338 about 3 12 miles (5.6 km) north of the A303 primary route, the town is approximately 8 miles (13 km) west of Andover, 12 miles (19 km) south of Marlborough, and 13 miles (21 km) north by north-east of Salisbury. The population of the parish at the 2011 census was approximately 10,600.

Chute, Wiltshire Human settlement in England

Chute is a civil parish in east Wiltshire, England, on the border with Hampshire. It includes the main village of Upper Chute and the smaller settlements of Lower Chute, Chute Standen, Chute Cadley and Mount Cowdown. The settlements are sometimes known collectively as "The Chutes". The nearest town is Andover, Hampshire, about 6 miles (10 km) to the southeast.

Ham, Wiltshire Human settlement in England

Ham is a small village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The parish borders the county of Berkshire, and the village lies about 3 14 miles (5.2 km) south of the Berkshire town of Hungerford.

Chirton Human settlement in England

Chirton is a village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, on the southern edge of the Vale of Pewsey about 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Devizes. The parish includes the hamlet of Conock.

Easton Royal Human settlement in England

Easton Royal is a village in the civil parish of Easton in Wiltshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Pewsey and 5 miles (8 km) south of Marlborough. The village was the location of Easton Priory from 1234 to 1536. The village mistakenly gained the Royal suffix in 1838 and the name Easton Royal has been in general use since the 1850s.

Shalbourne Human settlement in England

Shalbourne is a civil parish in the English county of Wiltshire, about 3 miles (4.8 km) southwest of Hungerford, Berkshire. Besides a village of the same name, the parish has a number of widely spaced small settlements including Bagshot and Stype, to the north, and Rivar and Oxenwood to the south. Before 1895, about half of the parish of Shalbourne lay in Berkshire.

Grafton, Wiltshire Human settlement in England

Grafton is a civil parish in Wiltshire, England, in the Vale of Pewsey about 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Marlborough. Its main settlement is the village of East Grafton, on the A338 Burbage - Hungerford road; the parish includes the village of Wilton and the hamlets of West Grafton, Marten and Wexcombe.

Sutton Benger Human settlement in England

Sutton Benger is a village and civil parish in the county of Wiltshire, England, 5 miles (8.0 km) northeast of Chippenham. The parish includes the hamlet of Draycot Cerne.

Swallowcliffe Human settlement in England

Swallowcliffe is a small village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about 2 miles (3.2 km) southeast of Tisbury and 11 miles (18 km) west of Salisbury. The village lies about half a mile north of the A30 Shaftesbury-Wilton road which crosses the parish.

Stourton with Gasper Civil parish in Wiltshire, England

Stourton with Gasper is a civil parish in the southwest of the English county of Wiltshire. Its main settlement is the village of Stourton, along with the hamlets of Bonham and Gasper. The village is about 2 12 miles (4 km) northwest of the small town of Mere, and is part of the Stourhead estate, which includes much of the west of the parish. The estate is in the ownership of the National Trust, and the entrance to the estate's famous house and garden is through the village.

Sutton Veny Human settlement in England

Sutton Veny is a village and civil parish in the Wylye valley, to the southeast of the town of Warminster in Wiltshire, England; the village is about 3 miles (5 km) from Warminster town centre. 'Sutton' means 'south farmstead' in relation to Norton Bavant, one mile (1.6 km) to the north. 'Veny' may be a French family name or may describe the village's fenny situation.

Shrewton Human settlement in England

Shrewton is a village and civil parish on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England, around 6 miles (9.7 km) west of Amesbury and 14 miles (23 km) north of Salisbury. It lies on the A360 road between Stonehenge and Tilshead. It is close to the source of the River Till, which flows south to Stapleford.

Stapleford, Wiltshire Human settlement in England

Stapleford is a village and civil parish about 4 miles (6.4 km) north of Wilton, Wiltshire, England. The village is on the River Till just above its confluence with the River Wylye.

Semley Human settlement in England

Semley is a village in Sedgehill and Semley civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The village is about 3 miles (4.8 km) north-east of Shaftesbury in neighbouring Dorset. The hamlet of Sem Hill lies about a quarter of a mile west of the village.

Fosbury Human settlement in England

Fosbury is a small village in Wiltshire, England, on the eastern edge of the county, near Hampshire. It lies about 11 miles (18 km) southeast of Marlborough and 7 miles (11 km) south of Hungerford, Berkshire. With few inhabitants, it forms part of the civil parish of Tidcombe and Fosbury, which has a parish meeting.

Lydiard Millicent Human settlement in England

Lydiard Millicent is a village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about 3 12 miles (6 km) west of the centre of Swindon. The parish contains the hamlets of Lydiard Green, Lydiard Plain, Greatfield and Green Hill; in the northeast the parish extends to Common Platt, which is now contiguous with the Peatmoor area of Swindon.

Tidcombe and Fosbury Human settlement in England

Tidcombe and Fosbury is a civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Marlborough and 7 miles (11 km) south of Hungerford, Berkshire. It includes the three small settlements of Fosbury, Tidcombe, and Hippenscombe and lies on the eastern edge of the county, where Wiltshire meets Hampshire.

Hippenscombe Human settlement in England

Hippenscombe is a hamlet within the civil parish of Tidcombe and Fosbury, Wiltshire, in the southwest of England. Marked only on large-scale maps, it lies to the southwest of Oakhill Wood and the northwest of Conholt Park, about 8 miles (13 km) south of Hungerford, Berkshire.

Sutton Mandeville Human settlement in England

Sutton Mandeville is a small village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, in the Nadder valley and towards the east end of the Vale of Wardour. The village lies south of the river and north of the A30 Shaftesbury-Wilton road, about 7 miles (11 km) west of Wilton and 2.5 miles (4 km) east of the large village of Tisbury.

Norton, Wiltshire Human settlement in England

Norton is a small village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) southwest of Malmesbury. The parish includes the hamlets of Foxley and Bremilham.

References

  1. "Tidcombe and Fosbury Parish Meeting". Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  2. Historic England. "Linear earthwork on Tidcombe Down (1004729)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  3. Historic England. "Long barrow 700m south of Tidcombe (1012253)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Baggs, A P; Freeman, J; Smith, C; Stevenson, J H; Williamson, E (1999). Crowley, D.A. (ed.). "Victoria County History: Wiltshire: Vol 16 pp215-222 – Tidcombe". British History Online. University of London. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  5. Tidcombe in the Domesday Book
  6. Historic England. "Tidcombe Manor (1365508)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  7. "No. 20534". The London Gazette . 15 November 1845. p. 4299.
  8. 1 2 3 Historic England. "Church of St. Michael (1299891)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  9. Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1975) [1963]. Wiltshire. The Buildings of England (2nd ed.). Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. p. 519. ISBN   0-14-0710-26-4.
  10. Historic England. "Tanner monument in churchyard (11033998)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 May 2020.
  11. Historic England. "Pair of Hawkins Monuments (11365507)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 May 2020.
  12. Historic England. "Hawkins Monument in Churchyard (11299862)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 May 2020.
  13. "No. 24728". The London Gazette. 27 May 1879. pp. 3603–4.
  14. "No. 33226". The London Gazette. 3 December 1926. pp. 7897–9.
  15. "No. 42846". The London Gazette. 30 November 1962. p. 9350.
  16. "No. 47987". The London Gazette. 25 October 1979. p. 13334.
  17. "St Michael's, Tidcombe". Savernake Team. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  18. Leigh Fermor, Patrick (3 March 2007). "Remembering Lord Jellicoe". The Spectator. Retrieved 21 May 2020.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Tidcombe at Wikimedia Commons