Tide-way

Last updated
Tide-way
Sire Fairway
Grandsire Phalaris
DamDrift
Damsire Swynford
SexMare
Foaled1933 [1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
Colour Brown
Breeder Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby
Owner17th Earl of Derby
TrainerColledge Leader
Record6: 3-0-0
Major wins
Fulbourne Stakes (1935)
Ham Produce Stakes (1935)
1000 Guineas (1936)

Tide-way (foaled 1933 after 1943) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She was rated one of the best British two-year-old fillies of 1935 when she won twice from four starts. She won the 1000 Guineas on her debut as a three-year-old but finished unplaced in the Epsom Oaks and never ran again. As a broodmare she produced the Eclipse Stakes winner Gulf Stream.

Thoroughbred Horse breed developed for racing

The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known for its use in horse racing. Although the word thoroughbred is sometimes used to refer to any breed of purebred horse, it technically refers only to the Thoroughbred breed. Thoroughbreds are considered "hot-blooded" horses that are known for their agility, speed, and spirit. Thoroughbreds also have a lot of success off the track, in homes such as showjumping, Eventing and dressage

Epsom Oaks British Group 1 horse race tor 3-year-old filles over 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 10 yards (2,423 metres)

The Oaks Stakes is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to three-year-old fillies. It is run at Epsom Downs over a distance of 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 6 yards, and it is scheduled to take place each year in early June. It is the second-oldest of the five Classic races, after the St Leger. Officially the Investec Oaks, it is also popularly known as simply The Oaks.

The Eclipse Stakes is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to horses aged three years or older. It is run at Sandown Park over a distance of 1 mile, 1 furlong and 209 yards, and it is scheduled to take place each year in early July.

Contents

Background

Tide-way was a brown mare bred and owned by Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby. During her racing career she was trained by Colledge Leader at Lord Derby's Stanley House stable in Newmarket, Suffolk. [2] Physically, she was described as "a charming filly, perhaps a little light on the leg, but level of back and of great quality". [3]

Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby British politician

Edward George Villiers Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby,, styled Mr Edward Stanley until 1886, then The Hon Edward Stanley and then Lord Stanley from 1893 to 1908, was a British soldier, Conservative politician, diplomat, and racehorse owner. He was twice Secretary of State for War and also served as British Ambassador to France.

Newmarket, Suffolk Market town in Suffolk, England

Newmarket is a market town in the English county of Suffolk, approximately 65 miles north of London. It is generally considered the birthplace and global centre of thoroughbred horse racing and a potential World Heritage Site. It is a major local business cluster, with annual investment rivalling that of the Cambridge Science Park, the other major cluster in the region. It is the largest racehorse training centre in Britain, the largest racehorse breeding centre in the country, home to most major British horseracing institutions, and a key global centre for horse health. Two Classic races, and an additional three British Champions Series races are held at Newmarket every year. The town has had close royal connections since the time of James I, who built a palace there, and was also a base for Charles I, Charles II, and most monarchs since. The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, visits the town often to see her horses in training.

Tide-way was sired by Fairway, an outstanding racehorse who won the St Leger, the Eclipse Stakes and two runnings of the Champion Stakes. At stud his other winners included Blue Peter, Watling Street, Garden Path, Pay Up and Fair Trial. Tide-way's dam Drift was a successful racehorse [2] but an even better broodmare whose other foals included Sun Stream and Heliopolis. [4]

Fairway (horse)

Fairway (1925–1946) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. Fairway was the best horse of his generation in Britain at two, three and four years old, winning the St Leger Stakes, the Champion Stakes (twice) and the Eclipse Stakes. He retired as a five-year-old in 1930 and went on to become a successful and influential sire.

Champion Stakes Flat horse race in Britain

The Champion Stakes is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to thoroughbreds aged three years or older. It is run at Ascot over a distance of 1 mile and 2 furlongs, and it is scheduled to take place as part of British Champions Day each year in October.

Blue Peter (British horse) British Thoroughbred racehorse

Blue Peter (1936–1957) was a British bred Thoroughbred racehorse whose career was cut short by the outbreak of World War II. He won The Derby and was later a Leading broodmare sire in Great Britain & Ireland.

Racing career

1935: two-year-old season

At Royal Ascot in June Tide-way showed good early speed butfinished unplaced behind Fair Ranee in the Queen Mary Stakes. [5] In the following month at Newmarket Racecourse the filly started favourite for the Fulbourne Stakes and won "fairly and squarely" from the colt Pay Up. [6] She went on to win the Ham Produce Stakes at Goodwood Racecourse and was unplaced on her only other start. [7]

The Queen Mary Stakes is a Group 2 flat horse race in Great Britain open to two-year-old fillies. It is run at Ascot over a distance of 5 furlongs, and it is scheduled to take place each year in June.

Newmarket Racecourse horse racing venue in England

Newmarket Racecourse is a British Thoroughbred horse racing venue in the town of Newmarket, Suffolk, comprising two individual racecourses, the Rowley Mile and the July Course. Newmarket is often referred to as the headquarters of British horseracing and is home to the largest cluster of training yards in the country and many key horse racing organisations, including Tattersalls, the National Horseracing Museum and the National Stud. Newmarket hosts two of the country's five Classic Races - the 1,000 Guineas and 2,000 Guineas, and numerous other Group races. In total, it hosts 9 of British racing's 36 annual Group 1 races.

A colt is a male horse, usually below the age of four years.

In the Free Handicap, a ranking of the year's best juveniles, Tide-Way was rated the third best filly behind Sansonnet (National Stakes and Crosspatch (Molecomb Stakes). [7]

The National Stakes is a Listed flat horse race in Great Britain open to horses aged two years old. It is run at Sandown Park over a distance of 5 furlongs and 10 yards, and it is scheduled to take place each year at the end of May.

The Molecomb Stakes is a Group 3 flat horse race in Great Britain open to two-year-old horses. It is run at Goodwood over a distance of 5 furlongs, and it is scheduled to take place each year in late July or early August.

1936: three-year-old season

In the 123rd running of the 1000 Guineas over the Rowley Mile course on 1 May Tide-way was ridden by Dick Perryman and started at odds of 100/30 against 21 opponents. Racing down the centre of the wide track, Tide-way was in front soon after half-way, fought off a challenge from the favourite Ferrybridge and pulled clear in the final strides to record a "very popular victory". [8] She won by one and a half lengths from her stablemate Feola, with Ferrybridge a neck away in third. [3]

Tide-way was aimed at the Epsom Oaks but was found to be "not herself" and was considered a doubtful runner in the week before the race. [9] Leader also had problems training the filly owing to the exceptionally firm ground in the early summer of 1936. [2] She nevertheless started favourite and appeared be going very well as the runners approached the straight but tired badly and finished eighth behind Lovely Rosa. [10] [11]

Tide-way did not race again and was retired at the end of the season.

Assessment and honours

In their book, A Century of Champions, based on the Timeform rating system, John Randall and Tony Morris rated Tide-way a "poor" winner of the 1000 Guineas. [10]

Breeding record

After her retirement from racing, Tide-way became a broodmare at Lord Derby's stud. She produced at least four foals between 1938 and 1943:

Pedigree

Pedigree of Tide-way (GB), brown mare, 1933 [1]
Sire
Fairway (GB)
1925
Phalaris (GB)
1913
Polymelus Cyllene
Maid Marian
Bromus Sainfoin
Cheery
Scapa Flow (GB)
1914
Chaucer St Simon
Canterbury Pilgrim
AnchoraLove Wisely
Eryholme
Dam
Drift (FR)
1926
Swynford (GB)
1907
John o'Gaunt Isinglass
La Fleche
Canterbury Pilgrim Tristan
Pilgrimage
Santa Cruz (GB)
1916
Neil Gow Marco
Chelandry
Santa BrigidaSt Simon
Bridget (Family 8-g) [4]

Related Research Articles

Lovely Rosa was an Irish-bred, British-trained Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare best known for her win in the 1936 Epsom Oaks. As a juvenile in 1945 she showed some promise when finishing second in the Queen Mary Stakes and winning a race at Newbury but then showed little worthwhile form until her 33/1 upset victory in the Oaks. She never won again and was retired at the end of 1936. She had some success as a broodmare, most notably being the grand-dam of Wilwyn.

Short Story was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. After showing considerable promise as a two-year-old, Short Story finished third in the 1000 Guineas in the following spring and then won the Epsom Oaks by four lengths. She never won again but was placed in the Nassau Stakes, Yorkshire Oaks and Park Hill Stakes. As a broodmare she produced one good racehorse, but otherwise made little impact as a dam of winners.

Brownhylda was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She showed considerable promise as a two-year-old when she won three times and finished twice on two occasions. In the following year he won the Epsom Oaks and the Park Hill Stakes as well as finishing second in the Yorkshire Oaks. Her form declined thereafter and she failed to win again before being retired at the end of the following year. She produced only four known foals, but these did include the St Leger winner Firdaussi.

Princess Dorrie was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. As a two-year-old in 1913 she failed to win a race but was very consistent, finishing placed in seven of her eight starts. In the following year she was probably the best three-year-old filly in England, winning both the 1000 Guineas and the Epsom Oaks. She was retired at the end of the 1914 season and had modest success as a broodmare.

Rosedrop

Rosedrop was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She won one minor race as a two-year-old in 1909 before emerging as a top-class performer in the following year. She won the Epsom Oaks, Atalanta Stakes and Great Yorkshire Stakes as well as finishing third in the 1000 Guineas and the Park Hill Stakes. After her retirement from racing she became a broodmare in England, and later in the United States. By far the best of her offspring was Gainsborough who won the 13th U.K. Triple Crown Champion and became a very successful breeding stallion.

Our Lassie was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She was a very good performer as a juvenile in 1902 when she won the Sandown Produce Stakes and was placed in her other three starts. In the following year she failed in the Lincoln Handicap but the recorded a decisive win in the Oaks Stakes. She failed to win or place in four subsequent races and was retired from racing at the end of 1904. As a broodmare she produced a few winners but had her biggest impact on the future of Thoroughbred racing through her unraced daughter Lady Brilliant.

Book Law was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. The best female racehorse of her generation in Britain, she was noted for her courage and consistency and in her prime she was described as a "fighting machine".

Tranquil (horse)

Tranquil was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She showed considerable promise as a two-year-old when she won one race and finished second in the Gimcrack Stakes. In the following season she was one of the best horses in Britain, scoring classic victories in the 1000 Guineas and St Leger Stakes as well as winning four other races including the Jockey Club Cup and Newmarket Oaks. he won once in 1924 before her racing career was ended by injury. She made no impact as a broodmare.

Pay Up was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. As a two-year-old in 1935 he showed promise as he won one race and was place in his other three starts. In the following spring he won the Free Handicap and then recorded his biggest success in the 2000 Guineas. He started favourite for Epsom Derby but finished fourth, sustaining leg injuries which ended his track career. He had little success as a breeding stallion.

Scuttle (horse)

Scuttle was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She showed considerable promise as a two-year-old in 1925 when she won three races including the Cheveley Park Stakes as well as finishing second in the Queen Mary Stakes. In the following spring she won on her seasonal debut and then recorded a popular and impressive victory in the 1000 Guineas. In her subsequent races she finished second in the Epsom Oaks, third in the Coronation Stakes and second in the Nassau Stakes. She was then retired to become a broodmare but died in 1934 at the age of nine. She was the first and only classic winner owned by King George V.

Roseway was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She showed promise as a juvenile in 1918 when she won twice and was second twice from seven starts. In the following spring she produced by far her best performance when she won the 1000 Guineas by six lengths. She finished second when odds-on favourite for the Oaks Stakes but ran poorly in two subsequent races and was retired from racing at the end of the year. She had some success as a broodmare both in Britain and in the United States.

Ferry was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. As a three-year-old in 1918 she recorded a major upset when winning the 1000 Guineas at odds of 50/1. She was later awarded second place in the Oaks Stakes but failed when matched against male opposition. She made little impact as a broodmare and ended her days in Poland.

Canyon was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. As a two-year-old in 1915 she won three races including the Bedford Stakes and the Bretby Stakes as well as finishing second in the Dewhurst Stakes. In the following spring she recorded her biggest win when defeating Fifinella in the 1000 Guineas. Canyon failed to win again but after her retirement from racing she became a very successful broodmare, whose offspring included Colorado and two other major winners.

Electra was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. A a two-year-old she showed considerable promise as she won four time from eight starts and finished second on three occasions. In the following year she won the 1000 Guineas and the Park Hill Stakes as well as finishing second in the Newmarket Stakes, Coronation Stakes and Free Handicap. She appeared to be most unlucky when running unplaced in the Epsom Oaks. She failed to win as a four-year-old and was retired from racing but later became a very successful broodmare.

Flair (horse) British Thoroughbred racehorse

Flair was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. After finishing fourth on her debut in July 1905 she was undefeated in her four subsequent races. She was the dominant two-year-old of either sex in England in the autumn of 1905, beating male opposition to take the Imperial Produce Stakes, Middle Park Plate and Free Handicap. In the following spring, she was a very easy winner of the 1000 Guineas and was strongly fancied for the Epsom Derby before her racing career was ended by injury. Her record as a broodmare was disappointing.

Aida (horse) horse

Aida was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. As a juvenile she finished second on her debut and then defeated the future Epsom Derby winner Volodyovski in the Imperial Produce Stakes. She won the 1000 Guineas on her first appearance of 1901 and then finished a close third in a very strong edition of the Newmarket Stakes. She finished unplaced in the Eclipse Stakes and the St Leger and was retired from racing at the end of the year. As a broodmare she had an enduring influence on the breed through her daughter Herself.

Chelandry British Thoroughbred racehorse

Chelandry (1894–1917) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She was the top-rated juvenile filly in England in 1896 when she won the Woodcote Stakes, Great Surrey Breeders' Foal Plate, National Breeders' Produce Stakes and Imperial Produce Stakes. In the following year she won the 1000 Guineas and finished second in both the Epsom Oaks and the St Leger. She remained in training as a four-year-old but failed to win again and was retired at the end of the year. After her retirement from racing, she became an exceptionally successful and influential broodmare.

Canterbury Pilgrim (1893–1917) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She showed some ability as a juvenile but failed to win a race. She won the Oaks Stakes on her first run as a three-year-old and went on to win the Liverpool Summer Cup, Park Hill Stakes and Jockey Club Cup before being retired at the end of the year. As a broodmare the best of her offspring was Swynford, a top-class racehorse who was even better as a breeding stallion. She also produced the influential sire Chaucer and several good broodmares. She has been described as "one of the most influential horses, stallion or mare, of the Twentieth Century".

Airs and Graces was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. As a two-year-old she raced in the colours of the 6th Duke of Portland and showed modest ability, winning one minor race. After being bought by the Australian sportsman W T Jones she showed much improved form at three in 1898, winning the Epsom Oaks and being placed in both the 1000 Guineas and the Coronation Stakes. She failed to win a race in 1900 but ran well to finish second in the Cambridgeshire Handicap. She was exported to France to become a broodmare and produced two top-class winners.

La Sagesse was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. She was highly tried as a juvenile in 1894, winning six of her thirteen races including the Newmarket Breeders' Plate and the Fitzwilliam Stakes. In the following year she finished second in the 1000 Guineas before recording her biggest victory in the Oaks Stakes and then running third under top weight in the Coronation Stakes. She remained in training until the age of five, competing against male opposition in valuable handicap races. She won the Derby Cup in 1896 and ran third in the City and Suburban Handicap in 1897.

References

  1. 1 2 "Tide-way pedigree". Equineline.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Mortimer, Roger; Onslow, Richard; Willett, Peter (1978). Biographical Encyclopedia of British Flat Racing. Macdonald and Jane’s. ISBN   0-354-08536-0.
  3. 1 2 "The One Thousand". Evening Post (New Zealand). 2 May 1936. p. 11 via Papers Past.
  4. 1 2 "Violet Melrose - Family 8-g". Thoroughbred Bloodlines.
  5. "Royal Ascot Races". Evening Post (New Zealand). 11 July 1935. p. 10 via Papers Past.
  6. "Lord Derby's Treble". Evening Post (New Zealand). 25 July 1935. p. 6 via Papers Past.
  7. 1 2 "The Free Handicap". New Zealand Herald. 21 March 2018. p. 7 via Papers Past.
  8. "English Racing". The Press. 26 May 1936. p. 15 via Papers Past.
  9. "Weights Declared". Evening Post (New Zealand). 26 June 1936. p. 13 via Papers Past.
  10. 1 2 Morris, Tony; Randall, John (1999). A Century of Champions. Portway Press. ISBN   1-901570-15-0.
  11. "Great Britain". The Australasian. 18 July 1936. p. 23 via trove.nla.gov.au.