Tiger Island (Antarctica)

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Tiger Island
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Tiger Island
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 76°47′S162°28′E / 76.783°S 162.467°E / -76.783; 162.467
Adjacent bodies of water Granite Harbor

Tiger Island is an island 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Lion Island on the north side of Granite Harbor, Victoria Land. The New Zealand Northern Survey Party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58) established a survey station on its highest point in October 1957. They named it in analogy with nearby Lion Island.

Island Any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines.

Lion Island, Victoria Land island of Victoria Land

Lion Island is a small island lying east of the mouth of Hunt Glacier in Granite Harbor, Victoria Land. It was named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13.

Victoria Land region of Antarctica

Victoria Land is a region of Antarctica which fronts the western side of the Ross Sea and the Ross Ice Shelf, extending southward from about 70°30'S to 78°00'S, and westward from the Ross Sea to the edge of the Antarctic Plateau. It was discovered by Captain James Clark Ross in January 1841 and named after the UK's Queen Victoria. The rocky promontory of Minna Bluff is often regarded as the southernmost point of Victoria Land, and separates the Scott Coast to the north from the Hillary Coast of the Ross Dependency to the south.

See also

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tiger Island" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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