Tiger goby

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Tiger goby
Scientific classification OOjs UI icon edit-ltr.svg
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Gobiiformes
Family: Oxudercidae
Genus: Pseudogobiopsis
Species:
P. tigrellus
Binomial name
Pseudogobiopsis tigrellus
(Nichols, 1951)
Synonyms
  • Gobius tigrellusNichols, 1951
  • Ctenogobius tigrellus(Nichols, 1951)

Pseudogobiopsis tigrellus, the Tiger goby, is a species of goby endemic to Indonesia where it is only known from the Mamberamo River, Irian Jaya, Indonesia. This species can reach a length of 2.3 centimetres (0.91 in) SL. [2]

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References

  1. Allen, G.R.; Larson, H. (2021). "Pseudogobiopsis tigrellus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2021: e.T9300A147532823. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2021-1.RLTS.T9300A147532823.en . Retrieved 16 November 2021.
  2. Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2013). "Pseudogobiopsis tigrellus" in FishBase . June 2013 version.