Tiger stripes

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Tiger stripes could refer to:

Tiger Largest species of the cat family

The tiger is the largest species among the Felidae and classified in the genus Panthera. It is most recognizable for its dark vertical stripes on reddish-orange fur with a lighter underside. It is an apex predator, primarily preying on ungulates such as deer and bovids. It is territorial and generally a solitary but social predator, requiring large contiguous areas of habitat, which support its requirements for prey and rearing of its offspring. Tiger cubs stay with their mother for about two years, before they become independent and leave their mother's home range to establish their own.

Tigerstripe

Tigerstripe is the name of a group of camouflage patterns developed for close-range use in dense jungle during jungle warfare by the South Vietnamese Armed Forces and adopted in 1964 by US Special Forces during the Vietnam War. During and following the Vietnam war the pattern was adopted by several other Asian countries. It derives its name from its resemblance to a tiger's stripes and were simply called "tigers." It features narrow stripes that look like brush-strokes of green and brown, and broader brush-strokes of black printed over a lighter shade of olive or khaki. The brush-strokes interlock rather than overlap, as in French Lizard pattern (TAP47) from which it apparently derives.

Tiger Stripes colour scheme

The Tiger Stripes colour scheme is a pattern of painting applied to locomotives to improve visibility. It entails painting the whole locomotive bright yellow, and adding diagonal black stripes to the front and back. It is called 'Tiger Stripes' because of its resemblance to the stripes of a tiger.

Related Research Articles

Flag of Cameroon flag

The national flag of Cameroon was adopted in its present form on 3 September 1990 after Cameroon became a unitary state. It is a vertical tricolour of green, red and yellow, with a five-pointed star in its center. There is a wide variation in the size of the central star, although it is always contained within the inside stripe.

Scientific essentialism, a view espoused by Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam, maintains that there exist essential properties that objects possess necessarily. In other words, having such and such essential properties is a necessary condition for membership in a given natural kind. For example, tigers are tigers in virtue of possessing a particular set of genetic properties, but identifying properties are nonessential properties. If a tiger lost a leg, or didn't possess stripes, we would still call it a tiger. They are not necessary for being a member of the class of tigers.

Brindle coat coloring pattern in some animals

Brindle is a coat coloring pattern in animals, particularly dogs, cattle, guinea pigs, and, rarely, horses. It is sometimes described as "tiger-striped", although the brindle pattern is more subtle than that of a tiger's coat. The streaks of color are irregular and usually darker than the base color of the coat, although very dark markings can be seen on a coat that is only slightly lighter.

Maltese tiger

The Maltese tiger, or blue tiger, is a reported but unproven coloration morph of a tiger, reported mostly in the Fujian Province of China. It is said to have bluish fur with dark grey stripes. Most of the Maltese tigers reported have been of the South Chinese population. The South Chinese tiger today is critically endangered, due to their illegal and continued use in traditional Chinese medicine and the "blue" alleles may be wholly extinct. Blue tigers have also been reported in Korea.

Amtrak paint schemes How trains on the railroad Amtrak have been painted

Amtrak has used a variety of liveries on its rolling stock since taking over intercity passenger rail service in the United States in 1971. A series of six schemes termed Phases, first introduced in 1972, have seen the widest use. Phases primarily use geometric arrangements of red, white, and blue - part of Amtrak's patriotic visual identity.

A Panthera hybrid is a crossbreed between any of the four species tiger, lion, jaguar and leopard in captivity. Most hybrids would not be perpetuated in the wild as males are usually infertile. Mitochondrial genome research revealed that wild hybrids were also present in ancient times. The mitochondrial genomes of snow leopard and lion was more similar to each other than to other Panthera species, indicating that at some point in their history, the female progeny of male ancestors of modern snow leopards and female ancestors of modern lions interbred with male ancestors of modern snow leopards.

A black tiger is a rare colour variant of the tiger and is not a distinct species or geographic subspecies.

Toyger Breed of cat

The toyger is a breed of domestic cat, the result of breeding domestic shorthaired tabbies to make them resemble a "toy tiger", as its striped coat is reminiscent of the tiger's. The breed's creator, Judy Sugden, has stated that the breed was developed in order to inspire people to care about the conservation of tigers in the wild. It was recognized for "registration only" by The International Cat Association in the early 1990s, and advanced through all requirements to be accepted as a full championship breed in 2007. There are about 20 breeders in the United States and another 15 or so in the rest of the world, as of 2012.

Stripe-necked mongoose species of mammal

The stripe-necked mongoose is a species of mongoose found in southern India to Sri Lanka.

Tiger stripes (Enceladus)

The tiger stripes of Enceladus consist of four sub-parallel, linear depressions in the south polar region of the Saturnian moon. First observed on May 20, 2005 by the Cassini spacecraft's Imaging Science Sub-system (ISS) camera, the features are most notable in lower resolution images by their brightness contrast from the surrounding terrain. Higher resolution observations were obtained by Cassini's various instruments during a close flyby of Enceladus on July 14, 2005. These observations revealed the tiger stripes to be low ridges with a central fracture. Observations from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument showed the tiger stripes to have elevated surface temperatures, indicative of present-day cryovolcanism on Enceladus centered on the tiger stripes.

Airman Battle Uniform

The Airman Battle Uniform (ABU) is a U.S. camouflage combat uniform; it is a service-distinctive uniform as it is primarily used by the United States Air Force, its civilian auxiliary, and some civilian employees of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). It replaced the Battle Dress Uniform on 1 November 2011 after a four-year phase-in period.

White tiger pigmentation variant of the Bengal tiger

The white tiger or bleached tiger is a pigmentation variant of the Bengal tiger, which is reported in the wild from time to time in the Indian states of Madhya Pradesh, Assam, West Bengal and Bihar in the Sunderbans region and especially in the former State of Rewa. Such a tiger has the black stripes typical of the Bengal tiger, but carries a white or near-white coat.

Truman the Tiger

Truman the Tiger is the official mascot of the athletic teams of the University of Missouri Tigers. Truman is named after U.S. President Harry S. Truman, who was from the U.S. state of Missouri. The mascot was named on September 12, 1986, though the use of a Bengal tiger as Missouri's mascot is traced to the 1890s. Truman has been awarded "best mascot in the nation" several times, most recently in 2014.

This article is about the conservation in Bhopal, the capital of Madhya Pradesh state of India.

Tigon hybrid cross between a male tiger and a lioness

A tigon or tiglon is a hybrid cross between a male tiger and a female lion. Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tigon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger, but in 1961, Gerald Iles wrote that he had been able to obtain three tigons, but he had never seen a liger.

Flag of New Orleans

The municipal flag of New Orleans is the representative banner of the U.S. city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The flag has a large white field that contains three gold fleurs-de-lis and is bordered on the top by a red stripe and from below by a blue stripe. The presence of the fleur-de-lis, a stylized depiction of a flower and a traditional French symbol, demonstrates the city's French heritage and strong ties to France.

Flag of Primorsky Krai

The flag of Primorsky Krai is a rectangular panel, divided diagonally by a white stripe and consisting of two triangles: the top one, placed at the flagpole, red and the bottom blue. In the upper corner near the shaft there is a golden image of a Ussuri tiger walking. The ratio of the width of the flag to its length is 2:3. The width of the white stripe on the shaft shall be one fifth of the entire width of the flag; the height of the tiger figure should be one fourth of the width of the flag on the pole. It is a representative, identification and legal mark, drawn up and used in accordance with the rules of vexillology. The idea of the flag was proposed by V. A. Obertas, a professor at the Institute of Architecture, FESTU.