Tigerstripe Ridge

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Tigerstripe Ridge ( 76°42′S161°30′E / 76.700°S 161.500°E / -76.700; 161.500 Coordinates: 76°42′S161°30′E / 76.700°S 161.500°E / -76.700; 161.500 ) is the north ridge of Flagship Mountain, notable for the alternating stripes of rock and snow which extend over much of its length, in the Convoy Range, Victoria Land. Descriptively named from the tigerlike stripes by a 1989-90 New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) field party.

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A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Flagship Mountain is a prominent, conical rock peak, 1,720 metres (5,640 ft) high, surmounting the southern part of the large rock mass between Northwind Glacier and Atka Glacier in the Convoy Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Northern Survey Party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58) after the USS Glacier, flagship of the American convoy into McMurdo Sound in the 1956–57 season, and closely associated with the area in other years.

Convoy Range is a broad mountain range in Antarctica. Much of the range has a nearly flat plateau-like summit, extending south from the Fry Saddle and ending at Mackay Glacier. The range has steep cliffs on its east side, but it slopes gently into the Cambridge Glacier on the western side.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tigerstripe Ridge" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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The Football is a prominent bare rock scar of football shape on the north side of Football Mountain in Antarctica, on the ridge separating Edisto Inlet and Tucker Glacier. The scar is surrounded by an unbroken snow slope and is said to be always visible, though occasionally lightly covered by snow for short periods, and is consequently a landmark for pilots and men at Hallett Station. It was given this descriptive name by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1957–58.

Tigerstripe

Tigerstripe is the name of a group of camouflage patterns developed for close-range use in dense jungle during jungle warfare by the South Vietnamese Armed Forces and adopted in 1964 by US Special Forces during the Vietnam War. During and following the Vietnam war the pattern was adopted by several other Asian countries. It derives its name from its resemblance to a tiger's stripes and were simply called "tigers." It features narrow stripes that look like brush-strokes of green and brown, and broader brush-strokes of black printed over a lighter shade of olive or khaki. The brush-strokes interlock rather than overlap, as in French Lizard pattern (TAP47) from which it apparently derives.

Asgard Range mountain range

The Asgard Range is a mountain range in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It divides Wright Valley from Taylor Glacier and Taylor Valley, and was named by the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE) (1958–59) after Asgard, the home of the Norse gods.

Mount Smith is a mountain over 1,400 m, standing north of Mawson Glacier and 7 miles (11 km) north-northwest of Mount Murray in Victoria Land, Antarctica. Discovered by the Discovery Expedition (1901–04), which probably named this peak for W. E. Smith, Chief Naval Constructor, who prepared the plans and supervised construction of the expedition ship RRS Discovery.

Mount Newall is a peak, 1,920 m, the northeast extremity of Asgard Range, in Victoria Land. Discovered by the Discovery expedition (1901–04) and named for one of the men who helped raise funds to send a relief ship for the expedition. Nichols Ridge descends from it down to the Wright Lower Glacier at the east end of Wright Valley. Gallagher Ridge trends northeast toward Wright Valley.

Asimut Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Asimutbreen Glacier is a small, steep tributary glacier to Vangengeym Glacier, descending southeast and then northeast between Solhogdene Heights and Skuggekammen Ridge, in the eastern Gruber Mountains of the Wohlthat Mountains, Queen Maud Land. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39, replotted from air photos and from surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Asimutbreen.

Wyandot Ridge is a rocky ridge at the west side of Chattahoochee Glacier. It extends northward from the northwest end of the Convoy Range. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and Navy air photos. Named in 1964 by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after the USS Wyandot, a cargo vessel in the American convoy to McMurdo Sound in several years beginning with the 1955-56 season.

Chattahoochee Glacier is a glacier in the Convoy Range which flows northeast between Wyandot Ridge and Eastwind Ridge. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and from Navy air photos, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1964 for the USNS Chattahoochee, a tanker in the American convoy into McMurdo Sound in the 1961–62 and 1962–63 seasons.

Ohau Peak is a sharp rock peak 1.9 nautical miles (3.5 km) northeast of the summit of Mount Terror on Ross Island. The feature rises to c.2400 m and is central in three aligned summits 0.8 nautical miles (1.5 km) north of Mount McIntosh. Named by New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) (2000) after a peak near the locality of Tekapo, New Zealand.

Mount Suess is a conspicuous mountain (1,190 m) surmounting the south part of Gondola Ridge, near the south side of Mackay Glacier in Victoria Land. It was discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition (1907–09) and is named after Eduard Suess, an Austrian geologist and paleontologist.

Punchbowl Cirque is a cirque in the southern part of Shipton Ridge, about 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) southwest of Roscolyn Tor, in the Allan Hills of Oates Land. It was reconnoitered by the New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) Allan Hills Expedition (1964), which gave the descriptive name.

Dotson Ridge is a ridgelike nunatak, 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) long, rising to 1,640 metres (5,380 ft) in the northwest part of Flight Deck Neve, Convoy Range. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and Navy air photos, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1964 for Morris F. Dotson, an electrician at McMurdo Station, 1962.

Elkhorn Ridge is a rugged ridge, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, between Towle Glacier and Northwind Glacier in the Convoy Range of Victoria Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and Navy air photos, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1964 for the USNS Elkhorn, a tanker in the American convoy into McMurdo Sound, 1961–62.

Flight Deck Névé is an elevated and unusually flat glacier névé, about 5 by 3 nautical miles, between Flagship Mountain and Mount Razorback in the Convoy Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The feature is the primary source of ice to the east-flowing Benson Glacier at Scuppers Icefalls. It is one of a group of nautical names in the Convoy Range applied by the New Zealand Geographic Board in 1994.

Gadarene Ridge is a ridge extending southward from Ship Cone in the Allan Hills of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was reconnoitered by the New Zealand Antarctic Research Program Allan Hills Expedition (1964) who gave the name, with reference to the Gadarene swine of the Bible, because of the swine-backed appearance of the feature in profile.

Midship Glacier is a broad flat glacier filling the bulk of Alatna Valley and having its origin on the slopes of Mount Morrison to the south, in the Convoy Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica. From 1957 this ice body was considered part of Benson Glacier, however, it was determined by a 1989–90 New Zealand Antarctic Research Programme field party that although it abuts against the main Benson Glacier at Jetsam Moraine, this glacier makes no contribution of ice to the Benson as its dominant ice flow is northward across its length. With the identification of Midship Glacier as a distinct feature, the application of Benson Glacier has been restricted to the ice flowing eastward from Flight Deck Névé to the terminus in Granite Harbour. The name was spproved by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1993 as recommended by the New Zealand Geographic Board.

Topside Glacier is a cirque glacier, 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) long, descending the south wall of Elkhorn Ridge in Greenville Valley, Convoy Range, Victoria Land. The name is a nautical approximation of the situation of the glacier. Named by a 1989-90 New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) field party to the area.

Toddy Pond is a pond in an enclosed basin on the rock flats 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of Flagship Mountain, in Convoy Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name is in the nautical beverage theme similar to Rum Pond and Tot Pond in this range. Named by a 1989-90 New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) field party.