Tighe Rock

Last updated

Tighe Rock ( 74°26′S100°4′W / 74.433°S 100.067°W / -74.433; -100.067 Coordinates: 74°26′S100°4′W / 74.433°S 100.067°W / -74.433; -100.067 ) is a rock outcropping along the coastal slope at the west margin of the Hudson Mountains, located 15 nautical miles (28 km) northwest of Mount Moses. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Robert F. Tighe, electrical engineer at Byrd Station, 1964–65.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Tighe Rock".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg


Related Research Articles

Ohio Range

The Ohio Range is a mountain range in the Transantarctic Mountains of Antarctica. It is about 48 km (30 mi) long and 16 km (10 mi) wide, extending WSW-ENE from Eldridge Peak to Mirsky Ledge. The range forms the northeast end of the Horlick Mountains and consists primarily of a large snow-topped plateau with steep northern cliffs and several flat-topped ridges and mountains. The highest point is the summit of Mount Schopf.

North West Cornice is a narrow rock ridge descending in a northwest direction from Big Ben on Heard Island, and terminating at Schmidt Glacier in the northwest part of the island. Surveyed and given this descriptive name by ANARE in 1948. Click here to see a map of North West Cornice and the northwestern coast of Heard Island.

Mount Bray is a rounded mountain that is ice-capped but has a steep, bare rock southeast face, situated east of Jenkins Heights and 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) northwest of Klimov Bluff on the Walgreen Coast, Marie Byrd Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Thomas K. Bray, a USGS topographic engineer with the Marie Byrd Land Survey party, 1966–67.

Buddha Rock is a rock, 35 metres (115 ft) high, lying 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) west of Vindication Island in the South Sandwich Islands. It was charted and named in 1930 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RSS Discovery II.

O'Kane Glacier is a steep glacier, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, draining the east wall of Eisenhower Range between Mount Baxter and Eskimo Point and flowing southeast to its terminus opposite the mouths of the Priestley and Corner Glaciers at the north extremity of Nansen Ice Sheet, in Victoria Land. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in association with O'Kane Canyon, located at the head of the glacier.

Cook Rock is an arched rock, 45 metres (150 ft) high, lying close east of Trousers Rock and 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) northeast of Vindication Island in the South Sandwich Islands. It was charted in 1930 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the Discovery II and named for Captain James Cook.

Noble Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Noble Glacier is a small glacier lying just north of Flagstaff Glacier on the east side of Keller Peninsula, King George Island, in the South Shetland Islands. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1960 for Hugh M. Noble of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), glaciologist at Admiralty Bay in 1957, who made detailed studies of the regime of Flagstaff and Stenhouse Glaciers.

Napier Rock

Napier Rock is a rock lying 1.75 nautical miles (3.2 km) east-southeast of Point Thomas in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, in the South Shetland Islands. Charted by the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1908–10. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1960 for Ronald G. Napier (1925–1956) of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), general assistant and handyman at the Signy Island station in 1955, and then leader at Admiralty Bay until he was drowned on March 24, 1956.

The Corner Cliffs are a rocky mass surmounted by two flat-topped summits 1.5 nautical miles (3 km), immediately south of Saturn Glacier and lying 2 nautical miles (4 km) northeast of Coal Nunatak in the southeast part of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The rocks of these cliffs were hidden from the line of sight by intervening ice slopes to the west, but the two rock ridges forming the northwest shoulder of this feature were first seen and photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth on November 23, 1935, and mapped from these photos by W.L.G. Joerg. The cliffs were first surveyed in 1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, who gave this name to mark the point where the exposed rock of eastern Alexander Island turns from a north-south direction toward the southwest.

Jurassic Nunatak is a small nunatak 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) northeast of Triassic Nunatak in the Yee Nunataks of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1961–68, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1987 after the Jurassic period in geological time and in association with Triassic Nunatak. The name does not imply the age of the rock constituting this feature.

Mount Judd is a prominent bare rock mountain, over 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) high, surmounting the ridge running north from Mount White in the Supporters Range in Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Robert C. Judd, a United States Antarctic Research Program meteorologist at South Pole Station, winter 1964, and Hallett Station, 1964–65 summer season.

Fullastern Rock is an isolated submerged rock lying in the middle of Johnston Passage 7 nautical miles (13 km) west-northwest of Cape Adriasola, Adelaide Island. The rock is potentially dangerous to ships and was so named when the RRS John Biscoe was compelled to go full astern to avoid this hazard.

Gardner Nunatak is a nunatak rising to about 1,670 metres (5,480 ft), 5.5 nautical miles (10 km) west-southwest of Tollefson Nunatak in the Yee Nunataks of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1961–68, and from Landsat imagery taken 1973–74, and was named in 1987 by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Robert N. Gardner, a USGS cartographer who participated in surveys at Cape Crozier, South Pole Station, and Palmer Station, 1973–74.

Mount Gorham is a mountain just southwest of Mount Tricorn in the Hutton Mountains of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–67, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Charles E. Gorham, a builder with the South Pole Station winter party in 1967.

Hodgson Nunatak is a nunatak which lies 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Teeters Nunatak and 20 nautical miles (37 km) northwest of Mount Moses in the Hudson Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Ronald A. Hodgson, U.S. Navy, a builder with the Byrd Station party, 1966.

Hobbs Glacier (James Ross Island) glacier in Antarctica

Hobbs Glacier is a glacier situated in a steep, rock-walled cirque at the northwest side of Hamilton Point, and flowing southeast into the southern part of Markham Bay on the east coast of James Ross Island, Antarctica. It was first seen and surveyed by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, under Otto Nordenskiöld, who named it for Professor William H. Hobbs, an American geologist and glaciologist.

Mount Machatschek is a prominent, mainly snow-covered mountain in northern Adelaide Island, Antarctica, about 14 nautical miles (26 km) southwest of Mount Velain. It was mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (1947–48) and the Falkland Islands and Dependencies Aerial Survey Expedition (1956–57), and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Austrian geomorphologist Fritz Machatschek (1876–1957), who was the joint author with Erich von Drygalski of Gletscherkunde, 1942.

Mount Rendu is a mountain between Reid Glacier and Heim Glacier on Arrowsmith Peninsula in Graham Land. Mapped by Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) from surveys and air photos, 1948–59. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Louis Rendu (1789–1859), French Bishop and scientist, author of Theorie des glaciers de la Savoie, an important book on the mechanism of glacier flow.

Rexford Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Rexford Glacier is a glacier flowing northeast into the head of Wagoner Inlet on the north side of Thurston Island. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Aviation Radioman Phillip W. Rexford, PBM Mariner aircrewman in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of this glacier and adjoining coastal areas, 1946–47.

League Rock is a distinctive rounded rock lying southwest of Box Reef, off the south end of Adelaide Island, Antarctica. It was surveyed by the Royal Navy Hydrographic Survey Unit, 1962–63, and was so named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee because the rock lies one league distant from what was then Adelaide Station.