Tignish, Prince Edward Island

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Tignish
Town of Tignish
Tignish sign.jpg
Primary Tignish welcome sign, located on Western road (Phillip street)
Motto: 
"Cherishing Our Heritage"
Coordinates: 46°57′02″N64°02′01″W / 46.95050°N 64.03356°W / 46.95050; -64.03356 Coordinates: 46°57′02″N64°02′01″W / 46.95050°N 64.03356°W / 46.95050; -64.03356
CountryCanada
Province Prince Edward Island
County Prince County
Parish North Parish
Township Lot 1
Founded1799
Village1952
Town2017
Government
  TypeTown council
  MayorAllan McInnis
Area
 (2016) [1]
  Land5.87 km2 (2.27 sq mi)
Elevation
15 m (49 ft)
Population
 (2016) [1]
  Total719
  Density122.5/km2 (317/sq mi)
Time zone UTC-4 (AST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-3 (ADT)
Canadian postal code
Area code 902
Telephone Exchange775 806 882
NTS Map 21I16 Tignish
GNBC CodeBAEGT
Website townoftignish.ca

Tignish is a Canadian town located in Prince County, Prince Edward Island. [2]

Contents

It is located approximately 50 miles (80 km) northwest of the city of Summerside, and 90 miles (140 km) northwest of the city of Charlottetown. [3] It has a population of 719. [1] The name "Tignish" is derived from the Mi'kmaq "Mtagunich", meaning "paddle". [4] The name is also believed to come from a Gaelic phrase meaning “Home Place”.[ citation needed ]

Tignish was founded in the late 1790s by nine francophone Acadian families, with further immigrants (mostly Irish) arriving in the 19th century and settling mostly in the nearby smaller locality of Anglo–Tignish (meaning "English Tignish"). Many of Tignish residents today are either of Acadian or Irish heritage.

One of the town's most popular and defining structures is the local Catholic church, St. Simon & St. Jude Catholic Church, which was among the first major structures built in Tignish, constructed between 1857 and 1860. Tignish was designated a community or village in 1952. It changed its status to a town in 2017. [5]

Demographics

Federal census population history of Tignish
YearPop.±%
1956914    
1961994+8.8%
1966982−1.2%
19711,060+7.9%
19761,077+1.6%
1981982−8.8%
1986960−2.2%
1991 893−7.0%
1996 839−6.0%
2001 831−1.0%
2006 758−8.8%
2011 779+2.8%
2016 719−7.7%
2021 744+3.5%
Source: Statistics Canada
[6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Tignish had a population of 744 living in 348 of its 368 total private dwellings, a change of

History

Tignish was settled in 1799 by eight Acadian families. Two Irish families joined them in 1811. [18]

Tignish was once the western terminus of the Prince Edward Island Railway. Rail service to the town was abandoned in 1989.

Community

Famed landmark, St. Simon & St. Jude Church. Tignish Church 2.JPG
Famed landmark, St. Simon & St. Jude Church.

Fishing is one of the most important aspects of daily life and employment in Tignish, with many local families depending on this industry for income. There are three functioning harbors located in the Tignish area: the Tignish harbour, the Skinner's Pond harbour, and the Seacow Pond harbour.

Among the businesses in Tignish include the Tignish Heritage Inn, which was a convent from 1867 through 1991, Eugene's General Store, Judy's Take-out (until 2013), Shirley's restaurant, Tignish Co-op grocery store, hardware store, and gas station, Tignish Cultural Center, Cousin's Diner (until 2016), Pizza Shack (until 2012), and Perry's Construction.

Citizens of Tignish celebrated the bicentennial of Tignish in 1999. Among local festivities were Acadian music, local parties, carnivals, and the creation of a local music CD rich with the voices of Tignish residents. In addition, each summer there is a bluegrass festival that is held in Tignish.

Education

Kindergarten–12 students in the Tignish area mostly attend Tignish Elementary School from grades K–6, followed by Merritt E. Callaghan Intermediate and Westisle Composite High schools for grades 7–12.

Government

Tignish is within district #27 of PEI's electoral boundaries, which is labeled the Tignish–Palmer Road division. There is a polling station at the Tignish fire hall, and others located elsewhere in Tignish as well as in St. Felix and Palmer Road. The name of the district used to be "Tignish–DeBlois", but was changed to "Tignish–Palmer Road" before the 2007 provincial election with slight boundary changes. As of the 2011 provincial election, Hal Perry is the MLA for the region. Perry left the PCs and joined the Liberals on 3 October 2013. As a Liberal, Perry won re-election in 2015 and 2019.

Surrounding communities

Nearby smaller localities, considered to be "part of" Tignish due to their proximity, include:

Mars crater namesake

The name "Tignish" has been adopted by the International Astronomical Union for a crater on the surface of Mars. The crater is located at −30.71 degrees south by 86.9 degrees east on the Martian surface. It was officially adopted by the IAU/WGPSN in 1991, and has a diameter of 13.7 miles (22.0 km). [19]

Climate

Tignish experiences a humid continental climate (Koppen: Dfb) with four seasons, with winter being the longest. Summers are very mild to warm due to the Gulf of St Lawrence moderating temperatures during the warmer months. Wintertime is very cold with daily highs often below freezing.

Climate data for Tignish
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)12.5
(54.5)
11.1
(52.0)
16.5
(61.7)
23
(73)
36.1
(97.0)
33
(91)
33.5
(92.3)
33
(91)
30
(86)
25
(77)
22
(72)
15
(59)
36.1
(97.0)
Average high °C (°F)−4.3
(24.3)
−3.8
(25.2)
0.8
(33.4)
6.2
(43.2)
13.9
(57.0)
19.6
(67.3)
23.4
(74.1)
22.9
(73.2)
17.8
(64.0)
11.7
(53.1)
5.5
(41.9)
−0.8
(30.6)
9.4
(48.9)
Average low °C (°F)−12.8
(9.0)
−12.5
(9.5)
−7.4
(18.7)
−1.7
(28.9)
3.8
(38.8)
9.6
(49.3)
13.6
(56.5)
13.4
(56.1)
9.1
(48.4)
4
(39)
−1
(30)
−8.2
(17.2)
0.8
(33.4)
Record low °C (°F)−30
(−22)
−27
(−17)
−24
(−11)
−12.5
(9.5)
−6.7
(19.9)
−1.5
(29.3)
4
(39)
3.9
(39.0)
−2
(28)
−6.5
(20.3)
−14
(7)
−24
(−11)
−30
(−22)
Average precipitation mm (inches)105.5
(4.15)
80.4
(3.17)
80.6
(3.17)
82.5
(3.25)
83.6
(3.29)
79.1
(3.11)
96
(3.8)
81
(3.2)
83.6
(3.29)
109.1
(4.30)
107.4
(4.23)
116.9
(4.60)
1,105.6
(43.53)
Source: Environment Canada [20]

See also

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References

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  2. "Municipal Councils and Contact Information" (PDF). Government of Prince Edward Island. 27 January 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  3. Government–sponsored `MapGuide` map of PEI. Retrieved on 28 March 2007.
  4. "Tignish Tellings". www.islandregister.com. Retrieved 4 January 2016.
  5. Kevin Yarr (29 March 2017). "Tignish to become a town". CBC. Retrieved 25 December 2017.
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  9. "1981 Census of Canada: Census subdivisions in decreasing population order" (PDF). Statistics Canada. May 1992. Retrieved 2 February 2021.
  10. "1986 Census: Population - Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions" (PDF). Statistics Canada. September 1987. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  11. "91 Census: Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1992. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  12. "96 Census: A National Overview - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1997. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  13. "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Prince Edward Island)". Statistics Canada. 15 August 2012. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  14. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Prince Edward Island)". Statistics Canada. 20 August 2021. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  15. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Prince Edward Island)". Statistics Canada. 25 July 2021. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  16. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Prince Edward Island)". Statistics Canada. 8 February 2017. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  17. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Prince Edward Island". Statistics Canada. 9 February 2022. Retrieved 3 March 2022.
  18. "The Town of Tignish". The Town of Tignish. Retrieved 12 September 2022.
  19. A Little Bit of Canada on the Red Planet Archived 31 March 2015 at the Wayback Machine
  20. Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 15 July 2009