Tijuana International Airport

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Tijuana International Airport

Aeropuerto Internacional de Tijuana
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Summary
Airport typeMilitary/Public
Operator Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico
Serves Tijuana-San Diego
Location Tijuana, Baja California
(CBX terminal in Otay Mesa, San Diego, California)
Opened1951
Hub for Volaris
Focus city for Viva Aerobus
Time zone PST (UTC-08:00)
  Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-07:00)
Elevation  AMSL 149 m / 489 ft
Coordinates 32°32′27″N116°58′12″W / 32.54083°N 116.97000°W / 32.54083; -116.97000
Website www.aeropuertosgap.com.mx/en/tijuana-3.html
Map
Location map Tijuana.png
Airplane silhouette.svg
TIJ
Location of the airport in Tijuana
Mexico Baja California location map.svg
Airplane silhouette.svg
TIJ
TIJ (Baja California)
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Airplane silhouette.svg
TIJ
TIJ (Mexico)
Runways
Direction LengthSurface
mft
09/272,9609,711 Asphalt
10/28 (closed)2,0006,561Asphalt
Statistics (2022)
Total passengers13,194,900
Ranking in Mexico5th Decrease2.svg
Source: Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico [1]

Tijuana International Airport (Spanish : Aeropuerto Internacional de Tijuana); officially Aeropuerto Internacional General Abelardo L. Rodríguez (General Abelardo L. Rodríguez International Airport)( IATA : TIJ, ICAO : MMTJ), is an international airport located 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) northeast of Downtown Tijuana. It serves Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, and the Metropolitan Area of San Diego-Tijuana, home to a population of five million inhabitants. The airport serves an extensive network of 42 domestic destinations including most of the major and secondary cities across Mexico. [2] It is a hub for Volaris and a focus city for Viva Aerobus. Additionally, the airport houses facilities for the Mexican Air Force and supports cargo flights, tourism, flight training, and general aviation activities. Operated by Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico, the airport is named after General Abelardo L. Rodríguez, President of Mexico from 1932 to 1934. It is Mexico's westernmost airport and second-northernmost airport after Mexicali International Airport.

Contents

Situated adjacent to the U.S. border, Tijuana Airport is the only geographically binational airport in the world, having direct access to its terminal from Mexico, and from its Cross Border Xpress (CBX) terminal in the United States. This unique feature allows passengers with a boarding pass to walk across a bridge crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. The CBX terminal handled 4,288,000 passengers in 2023, constituting approximately one-third of all passenger movements at Tijuana Airport. [1]

The airport ranks as the fifth busiest airport in Mexico for both passenger numbers and aircraft movements and holds the 13th position in Latin America and the 55th position in North America. It has witnessed significant growth, handling 8,925,900 passengers in 2019 and reaching 13,194,900 passengers in 2023. In 2022, Tijuana International Airport became the fifth airport in the country to surpass ten million passengers in a calendar year. [1]

History

Early years

Volaris Airbus A320 departing TIJ Aeropuerto de Tijuana 2.jpg
Volaris Airbus A320 departing TIJ

Tijuana Airport, inaugurated as the 'Aeropuerto Federal de Tijuana' on May 1, 1951, replaced the former airport located on today's Aguacaliente Boulevard . The initial passenger terminal was situated on the southwest side of the airport grounds, facing the present terminal. In 1954, Mexicana de Aviación began direct flights from Tijuana to Mexico City. In 1965, as part of the National Plan of Airports introduced during President Diaz Ordaz's administration, the airport became part of the Government-owned corporation Aeropuertos y Servicios Auxiliares (ASA). The growing population in Tijuana during the 1960s led to an increased demand for flights. [3]

The airport's 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) long runway, with an orientation of 10/28, had its northern end located less than 100 metres (330 ft) south of the U.S. border wall. This meant that departing airplanes entered U.S. airspace after takeoff. The year 1969 marked the introduction of Operation Intercept, aimed at curbing narcotics flow between the U.S. and Mexico. Rising political pressure to reduce incursions into U.S. airspace resulted in the requirement to reorient the runway from 10/28 to 09/27. [4]

In 1970, a new 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) long runway (09/27) and a terminal capable of accommodating larger aircraft were constructed north of the existing runway. The new runway direction impacted Tijuana's approach, particularly over Cerro San Isidro, a 792 metres (2,598 ft) high land obstacle, causing an increase in the east approach glide slope beyond 3 degrees and hindering a full Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach on runway 27, necessary during adverse weather conditions. [5]

The original terminal then transitioned into an air base for the Mexican Air Force, now known as the 'Aeropuerto Viejo' or old airport. During the 1970s, Tijuana experienced rapid growth, leading to expansions in both terminal and parking areas to meet escalating airport demand.

Privatization

In the 1980s, both terminal space and passenger parking at Tijuana Airport became insufficient to meet demand. In 1990, Mexico initiated its first two 10-year joint ventures with private investors. One of the initial projects involved expanding both the departure concourse and parking areas.

The year 1995 marked a significant change with the publication of the 'Ley de Aeropuertos' (Airports Law) by the Department of Communications and Transportation (Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transporte), marking the beginning of Mexico's airport privatization program. In 1999, Tijuana Airport joined Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico (GAP), a consortium headquartered in Guadalajara. This consortium included Spanish investors Unión Fenosa, Dragados, and Aeropuertos Españoles y Navegación Aérea (AENA), along with Mexican strategic investor Grupo Empresarial Ángeles, managing a total of 12 airports. [6]

Under the airport privatization concession in 2002, an expansion project was undertaken by the airport management. The extension of concourses A and B allowed for a doubling of the terminal's capacity. Furthermore, several taxiways were expanded to accommodate larger aircraft, such as the Boeing 747.

Satellite view of the airport Tijuana International Airport by Planet Labs.jpg
Satellite view of the airport

Growth and hub years

Throughout its history, Tijuana Airport has served as a strategic hub for various airlines. In the 1990s, up until its discontinuation of services in 2006, Aero California utilized the airport as a hub, offering services to over 12 domestic cities. Other airlines such as TAESA, Aerolíneas Internacionales, Líneas Aéreas Azteca, and Avolar also established their hubs in Tijuana during the 1990s and early 2000s, operating extensive domestic networks. Notably, Avolar had its maintenance base at a large hangar facility in Tijuana, later acquired by Volaris. Volaris initiated operations in Tijuana in 2006, gradually expanding its services and transforming Tijuana into a hub with connections to more than 35 destinations.

As the airport grew in significance, emerging as one of the country's largest hubs, plans for a new terminal were contemplated, though no tangible progress has been made. Between 2011 and 2012, significant renovations occurred in the passenger terminal, particularly in Concourses A and B. These enhancements included the establishment of new customs and international arrivals facilities and the construction of a new bus terminal.

Binational operations

CBX terminal arrivals facility Cross Border Xpress 8.jpg
CBX terminal arrivals facility
Tijuana cross-border terminal concept with commercial components to further cross-border trade and services Tijuana Airport Cross-border Commerce Center.jpg
Tijuana cross-border terminal concept with commercial components to further cross-border trade and services

On December 9, 2015, the Cross Border Xpress (CBX) was officially opened, establishing a physical connection between the passenger terminal in Tijuana and a new terminal in San Diego. This innovative project facilitates seamless passenger crossings between the two countries, effectively transforming Tijuana Airport into a geographically binational airport with direct access from both Mexico and the United States. The realization of this project follows decades of planning and negotiations, addressing aspects such as border control, management, funding, and construction. Notably, on December 19, 2015, the airport experienced its busiest day, recording a total of 164 flights between departures and arrivals.

The airport's proximity to the U.S. border makes it an appealing option for cross-border travelers heading to Mexican cities. However, due to its close proximity to San Diego Airport and the high transportation taxes for international flights in Mexico, the airport has not been able to retain international destinations. Passengers traveling to destinations in the United States and abroad typically choose to use San Diego International Airport, which is situated less than 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Tijuana Airport.

In 2022, an expansion of the passenger terminal was constructed. Named 'Nuevo Edificio Procesador' (New Processing Building), it features additional check-in counters, security lanes, boarding gates, and immigration facilities for both international flights and cross-border passengers entering from San Diego. [7] The expansion aims to attract flight services to Asia and South America, with the goal of turning Tijuana Airport into a convenient alternative to U.S. airports for connecting passengers traveling between the two continents. Future plans for the airport include the addition of a hotel and a new bus terminal. [8]

Routes evolution

Aeromexico Boeing 737 at TIJ TIJ main1.JPG
Aeroméxico Boeing 737 at TIJ

In 1954, Mexicana de Aviación introduced direct flights from Tijuana to Mexico City. During the '70s, the cargo airline AeroCarga offered flights from Tijuana to La Paz, Mexico City, and Mérida, utilizing a fleet of Douglas DC-6 aircraft. In 1971, Aeroméxico initiated flights to Mexico City with Douglas DC-8 equipment, and by 1976, it expanded its services with McDonnell Douglas DC-10 equipment to Guadalajara and Mexico City. Mexicana reinaugurated its Tijuana flights in 1978, operating a daily flight from Mexico City with a stop in La Paz, using Boeing 727 equipment.

In 1983, Aero California launched the Tijuana-Los Mochis-Guadalajara route with McDonnell Douglas DC-9 jets. Mexicana inaugurated the Guadalajara route in 1985, operating various aircraft, including Boeing 727, Boeing 757, Airbus A318, Airbus A319, and Airbus A320, over a span of 25 years. In the summer of 1987, Aeroméxico introduced flights to Bogotá, Colombia, utilizing Douglas DC-8-62 equipment on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays. However, in 1988, Aeroméxico faced a crisis, declaring bankruptcy and undergoing restructuring, which impacted its services in Tijuana. In 1991, TAESA initiated flights to Mexico City with a stop in Los Mochis, employing Boeing 727 equipment.

In 2006, Aeroméxico launched the Tijuana-Acapulco route, utilizing Boeing 737-700 aircraft. The same year, Líneas Aéreas Azteca initiated flights to Oakland. Viva Aerobus began operations in Tijuana from its Monterrey hub in 2006, operating Boeing 737-300 equipment. Interjet introduced flights to Mexico City in 2008. In 2009, Mexicana closed routes to Culiacán and Puebla, ultimately declaring bankruptcy in 2010. From 2006 until September 2014, Aeroméxico operated three weekly flights to Tokyo-Narita with a Boeing 777-200, but in September 2014, these flights were relocated to Monterrey. [9] Additionally, Aeroméxico provided services to Shanghai from 2006 to 2009 and then again from 2010 to 2019. [10] In 2012, regional airline Calafia Airlines initiated twice-weekly flights to Tijuana, following the route Tijuana-Loreto-La Paz. Viva Aerobus suspended its operations in Tijuana in 2014. Interjet started operations on the Acapulco-Tijuana-Acapulco route in 2015, utilizing the Sukhoi Superjet 100. On March 4, 2015, Volaris resumed the Tijuana-Oakland route, offering 2 flights per week. Initially launched in August 2009 and operating daily, the route was canceled due to poor results.

Volaris Airbus A320 at TIJ Aeropuerto de Tijuana 1.jpg
Volaris Airbus A320 at TIJ

On October 1, 2015, Aeroméxico Connect resumed flights from Tijuana to Monterrey, operated by the Embraer 170. Viva Aerobus also resumed its flights in Tijuana on November 19, 2015, with Mexico City as its first route, marking the beginning of its current operating base and focus city service.

From 2017 to 2018, Volaris Costa Rica initiated flights to San Salvador and Guatemala City. From 2018 to 2020, the Chinese airline Hainan Airlines commenced three weekly flights from Beijing to Tijuana and Mexico using Boeing 787-8 equipment. International service is set to resume on February 15, 2024, with American Eagle launching flights to Phoenix, Arizona.

Volaris is the largest operator in the airport, offering flights to more than 35 domestic destinations. Additionally, along with Viva Aerobus, it serves the longest domestic non-stop route in Mexico, from Tijuana to Cancún, with a flight time of over 4 hours.

Facilities

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Terminal layout
CBX terminal entrance CBX Tijuana 02.jpg
CBX terminal entrance

The airport features a single 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) long 09/27 runway, a parallel taxiway, and an apron with 23 parking positions, mostly arranged for narrow-body commercial aircraft surrounding the two terminal pier buildings. There are 12 positions with direct access to the terminal and 11 remote positions. Adjacent to this area, there is a general aviation apron offering stands for fixed-wing aircraft and heliports for private aviation, as well as hangars and maintenance facilities. The airport features a high-tech control tower, one of the tallest in Mexico.

On the opposite side of the Main Terminal building, there is another terminal, the Old Airport Terminal, and a former runway. The Old Airport Terminal houses military facilities, and south of the former runway, 4 remote positions are located, mostly used by cargo airliners. These are linked by a shorter taxiway to the main runway. The airport is also used to a lesser extent for general aviation, housed at the General Aviation Building (GAB).

Runway 09/27 runs east–west approximately 300 metres (980 ft) south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The approach to the runway is either from the east (normally) or from the west (when Santa Ana wind conditions exist). Due to prevailing winds, the 27 runway is Tijuana's main approach pattern. The airport can handle up to 10 million passengers per year and 360 flights per day. It is capable of handling widebody aircraft such as the Boeing 787 and 747.

Passenger Terminal

Concourse A MMTJ010.jpg
Concourse A
Concourse A MMTJ008.jpg
Concourse A

The passenger terminal accommodates both arrival and departure services for domestic and international flights within a multi-story building, including two pier concourses with 20 gates. The ground floor of the main building includes check-in areas and an arrivals section featuring a baggage claim area and an arrivals hall. Here, passengers can access car rental services, taxi stands, snack bars, and souvenir shops. The first floor houses the main hall, which features a security checkpoint and an airside corridor leading to Concourses A and B. This zone is equipped with food stands, duty-free shops, and a VIP lounge. [11] The gates are located in two piers, designated A and B, which are connected to the main terminal. It is designed so that international flights can be handled at Concourse B and domestic flights at both concourses. Additionally, gates 19 and 20 are located at the east end of the terminal, where passengers board their aircraft directly from the apron.

Concourse A serves domestic flights and features sitting areas with shops and food stands. It has nine gates: gates 1-5 are located on the top floor and are equipped with jet bridges, while gates 6-9 are located on the ground floor, where passengers board their aircraft directly from the apron. Airlines operating from this satellite include Aeromexico, Volaris, Magnicharters, and Calafia Airlines.

Concourse B serves domestic and international flights. It features the same layout as Concourse A with sitting areas, food stands, and duty-free shops. This concourse features eight gates: gates 10-14 are located on the top floor and are equipped with jet bridges, while gates 15-18 are located on the ground floor, where passengers board their aircraft directly from the apron. Airlines operating from Concourse B include Aeromexico, Viva Aerobus, Volaris, and from 2024, American Eagle.

The top floor of the terminal houses international arrivals corridors and the entrance vestibule for passengers coming from the Cross Border Xpress (CBX) terminal in San Diego. The vestibule leads to a Mexican immigration and customs facility and a check-in area for international passengers.

Cross Border Xpress CBX

CBX terminal on the U.S. side of the border Cross Border Express foto 2.jpg
CBX terminal on the U.S. side of the border
Central courtyard at the CBX terminal Cross Border Xpress 7.jpg
Central courtyard at the CBX terminal

The Cross Border Xpress (CBX), also known as the Cross-Border Terminal, is a 4,200 square metres (45,000 sq ft) terminal located in southern San Diego, California, adjacent to the Mexican border, serving approximately one-third of Tijuana Airport's passengers. It uniquely positions Tijuana Airport as a geographically binational airport. The CBX comprises a terminal building physically located on U.S. soil, adjacent to the border, and a 120 metres (390 ft) bridge across the border connecting to the Mexican immigration and customs facilities at Tijuana Airport. It facilitates direct access for U.S. passengers to Tijuana Airport and provides Mexican and international carriers with direct entry to the U.S. market. [12] [13]

The building serves departure and arrival facilities. Departing passengers can enter the building on the U.S. side before crossing the pedestrian bridge over the border, clearing immigration and customs, and boarding flights in the departure concourses in Tijuana. Arrival passengers in Tijuana can access the bridge from the baggage claim area at the terminal in Tijuana and walk across the border into U.S. customs and immigration facilities at the CBX terminal. [14] [15]

The building's design is the work of the late Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta. Its central articulator node, dividing flows and functions, is a purple open central courtyard with an ash tree and a reflecting pool, referencing vernacular Mexican architecture. [12] The arrivals hall features car rental facilities, bus agencies, and a snack bar. [16] [17]

The concept of a cross-border terminal was initially proposed in the 1960s as part of a broader plan to modernize Mexico's airports. Despite multiple developments and setbacks, construction commenced in 2013. With an initial estimated cost of US$78 million and a final completion cost of US$120 million, it officially opened on December 9, 2015. Building E, which hosts the parking facilities at Tijuana's Terminal underwent restructuring to support the new bridge's structure. The project received accolades for its design and innovation and has undergone renovations and additions, including a new restroom facility and duty-free area completed in 2020. [18]

Old airport terminal seen from above TIJ oldterminal.JPG
Old airport terminal seen from above

Other facilities

The cargo area of the airport 72130220 8TT hQNE902uLMc 79eM6Wdr2JH8ztYKdsG1wVny3WI.jpg
The cargo area of the airport

The General Aviation Building (GAB) is used for general/non-commercial aviation or private jets. The GAB is designed to receive up to 120 persons per hour and has all the services for the convenience of passengers during their private flights. It covers a surface area of 420 square metres (4,500 sq ft), housing government offices, administrative offices, a pilots lounge, and a passenger lounge. Two aviation schools are based at this terminal, along with one cargo airline operating there.

Brown Field Municipal Airport (SDM) in San Diego, California lies just over 1,900 metres (6,200 ft) north of the airport, with a similar runway length and orientation. SDM is a general aviation field not set up for scheduled passenger service. Both SDM and TIJ are designated as ports of entry for their respective countries.

Air Force Base Nr. 12 (Spanish : Base Aérea Militar N.º 12, Tijuana, Baja California) (B.A.M. No. 12) is a facility of the Mexican Air Force located on the airport grounds. Currently, it does not have an assigned air squadron. It has an aviation platform of 14,400 square metres (155,000 sq ft), one hangar, and other facilities for the accommodation of air force personnel. These facilities are located at The Old Airport Terminal. [16]

Baggage claim area Aeropuerto de Tijuana 8.jpg
Baggage claim area
Entrance hall at the passenger terminal MMTJ0001 01.jpg
Entrance hall at the passenger terminal
Departures hall at CBX Cross Border Xpress 9.jpg
Departures hall at CBX

Airlines and destinations

Passenger

AirlinesDestinations
Aeroméxico Mexico City
American Eagle Phoenix–Sky Harbor [19]
Calafia Airlines La Paz, Loreto, Puerto Peñasco
Seasonal: Guadalajara
Mexicana de Aviación Mexico City–AIFA [20]
Viva Aerobus Cancún, Culiacán, Guadalajara, León/Del Bajío, Mazatlán, Mexico City, Mexico City–AIFA, Monterrey, Morelia, Oaxaca, Puebla, Puerto Vallarta, San José del Cabo, Tulum [21]
Volaris Acapulco, Aguascalientes, Cancún, Chihuahua, Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Obregón, Colima, Culiacán, Durango, Guadalajara, Hermosillo, Huatulco, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, La Paz, León/Del Bajío, Loreto, Los Mochis, Mazatlán, Mérida, Mexico City, Mexico City–AIFA, Monterrey, Morelia, Oaxaca, Puebla, Puerto Escondido, Puerto Vallarta, Querétaro, San José del Cabo, San Luis Potosí, Tapachula, Tepic, Toluca/Mexico City, Torreón/Gómez Palacio, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Uruapan, Veracruz, Villahermosa, Zacatecas

Cargo

AirlinesDestinations
Aeronaves TSM Hermosillo, Querétaro
AeroUnion Mexico City-AIFA [22]
China Southern Cargo Mexico City-AIFA, Shanghai-Pudong
Estafeta Culiacán, Hermosillo
FedEx Express Memphis, Wichita
IFL Group
on behalf of FedEx Feeder
San Diego
TUM AeroCarga Guadalajara, Hermosillo, Toluca/Mexico City

Destinations map

Statistics

Passengers

Tijuana Airport Passengers. See Wikidata query.

Busiest routes

Busiest routes from Tijuana International Airport (2023) [23]
RankCityPassengersRankingAirline
1Flag of Mexico City.svg  Mexico City, Mexico City 1,092,572Steady2.svg Aeroméxico, VivaAerobús, Volaris
2Flag of Jalisco.svg  Jalisco, Guadalajara 1,030,609Steady2.svgAeroméxico, Magni, VivaAerobús, Volaris
3Flag of Sinaloa.svg  Sinaloa, Culiacán 468,777Steady2.svgVivaAerobús, Volaris
4Flag of Guanajuato.svg  Guanajuato, León/El Bajío 347,462Steady2.svgVivaAerobús, Volaris
5Flag of Nuevo Leon.svg  Nuevo León, Monterrey 296,821Increase2.svg 1VivaAerobús, Volaris
6Flag of Michoacan.svg  Michoacán, Morelia 265,790Decrease2.svg 1VivaAerobús, Volaris
7Flag of Quintana Roo.svg  Quintana Roo, Cancún 260,692Increase2.svg 2VivaAerobús, Volaris
8Flag of Baja California Sur.svg  Baja California Sur, San José del Cabo 235,182Decrease2.svg 1 Calafia Airlines, VivaAerobús, Volaris
9Flag of Jalisco.svg  Jalisco, Puerto Vallarta 216,149Decrease2.svg 1VivaAerobús, Volaris
10Flag of Sinaloa.svg  Sinaloa, Mazatlán 172,825Steady2.svgVivaAerobús, Volaris
11Flag of Sonora.svg  Sonora, Hermosillo 139,176New.pngVolaris
12Flag of Oaxaca.svg  Oaxaca, Oaxaca 136,036New.pngVivaAerobús, Volaris
13Flag of Puebla.svg  Puebla, Puebla 108,063New.pngVivaAerobús, Volaris
14Flag of Aguascalientes.svg  Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes 102,853New.pngVolaris
15Flag of the State of Mexico.svg  State of Mexico, Mexico City-AIFA 102,059New.pngVivaAerobús, Volaris

Ground transportation

Bus

The airport may be reached from Downtown Tijuana or Zona Rio by local bus. It costs $11.00 MXN (US$0.60).

Shuttle

Volaris provides a shuttle service from San Diego, California, to Tijuana Airport, allowing San Diego residents to make connections within Mexico. Passengers cannot board this shuttle at San Diego International Airport but instead take a local bus from the airport to the Amtrak Station at 1050 Kettner Blvd. on the corner of Broadway Ave, Downtown San Diego, CA 92101. [24] There is no equivalent shuttle from Tijuana Airport back to downtown San Diego, as most people who connect between Tijuana Airport and San Diego pay to use the Cross Border Xpress and then take private vehicles or use Uber or taxi services since there is no public transportation from CBX.

Taxi

Due to a prohibition by Mexican law, public taxis from Mexican cities may drop passengers at the airport but cannot pick up passengers from the terminal. The airport, therefore, offers transportation for passengers from the terminal to any point in the city on SAAT Taxis Servicio Aeroportuario de Autotransporte Terrestre (Terrestrial Transport Airport Service), an airport government-leased taxi company. This and other authorized taxi carriers may be reached at the arrivals hall. This inflates taxi prices, forcing passengers to either pay them or walk outside the airport.

See also

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Chihuahua International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Chihuahua); officially Aeropuerto Internacional General Roberto Fierro Villalobos(General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport) (IATA: CUU, ICAO: MMCU) is an international airport located in Chihuahua, Mexico. It handles both national and international air traffic for the city of Chihuahua and is operated by Grupo Aeroportuario Centro Norte. The airport was named after Roberto Fierro Villalobos, an aviator pilot of the Mexican Air Force known for his role during the Mexican Revolution. In addition to serving national and international passengers, Chihuahua Airport accommodates military facilities for the Mexican Army and supports logistics and cargo airlines. It also facilitates various tourism, flight training, and general aviation activities.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">General Francisco Mujica International Airport</span> International airport serving Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico

Morelia International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional General Francisco J. Mujica(General Francisco J. Mujica International Airport) is an international airport located in Álvaro Obregón, Michoacán, Mexico. It serves the Metropolitan Area of Morelia, Michoacán, and is the largest airport in the state of Michoacán. In addition to providing domestic flights within Mexico, it serves as a gateway for international travel, connecting Central Mexico to multiple destinations in the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Licenciado Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport</span> International airport in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico

Puerto Vallarta International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional Licenciado Gustavo Díaz Ordaz(Licenciado Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport) is an international airport managing both domestic and international air traffic for Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico. It serves as a gateway to the Mexican tourist destination of Riviera Nayarit and the Jalisco coast year-round, offering flights to and from Mexico, the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The airport also houses facilities for the Mexican Army and supports various tourism, flight training, and general aviation activities. Operated by Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico, it is named after President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bajío International Airport</span> International airport serving León, Guanajuato, Mexico

León/Bajio International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional de Guanajuato, is an international airport situated in Silao, Guanajuato, Mexico. It is the main international airport serving the Greater León Metropolitan Area and the State of Guanajuato, which is home to a population of 6 million residents, including the cities of Celaya, Guanajuato, Irapuato, Salamanca, and San Miguel de Allende. In addition to offering domestic flights within Mexico, it serves as a gateway for international travel, connecting Central Mexico to various destinations in the United States. It serves as a focus city for Volaris and supports flight training, cargo, logistics and general aviation activities.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mérida International Airport</span> Airport in Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico

Mérida International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional Manuel Crescencio Rejón(Manuel Crescencio Rejón International Airport) is an international airport located in the Mexican city of Mérida. It serves as the primary international gateway to Mérida and the State of Yucatán, a popular tourist destination, offering flights to and from Mexico, the United States, Canada, Central America, and the Caribbean. The airport also accommodates facilities for the Mexican Airspace Navigation Services, and the Mexican Army, and supports various tourism, flight training, and general aviation activities. Additionally, it serves as a focus city for Viva Aerobus.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Durango International Airport</span> International airport in Durango, Mexico

Durango International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Durango); officially Aeropuerto Internacional General Guadalupe Victoria(General Guadalupe Victoria International Airport) (IATA: DGO, ICAO: MMDO) is an international airport situated in the city of Durango, Mexico. It manages national and international air traffic in the metropolitan area of Durango and the entire state of Durango. It also supports various tourism, flight training, executive, and general aviation activities. Operated by Grupo Aeroportuario Centro Norte (OMA), the airport is named after Guadalupe Victoria, the first President of Mexico. In 2022, the airport handled 485,524 passengers, and in 2023 it handled 513,246 passengers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Veracruz International Airport</span> International airport in Veracruz, Mexico

Veracruz International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Veracruz Heriberto Jara); officially Aeropuerto Internacional Heriberto Jara(General Heriberto Jara International Airport) (IATA: VER, ICAO: MMVR) is an international airport located in Veracruz, Mexico. It handles national and international air traffic for the Metropolitan Area of Veracruz and a significant portion of the State of Veracruz, including the metropolitan areas of Córdoba, Orizaba, and Xalapa. The airport is named in honor of General Heriberto Jara, a Constituent Deputy and former Governor of Veracruz. It is operated by the Grupo Aeroportuario del Sureste (ASUR).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Villahermosa International Airport</span> International airport in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico

Villahermosa International Airport ; officially known as Aeropuerto Internacional Carlos Rovirosa Pérez(Carlos Rovirosa Pérez International Airport) is an international airport located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico. It serves the Metropolitan Area of Villahermosa, the entire State of Tabasco, and Northern Chiapas. The airport offers domestic flights within Mexico and supports various tourism, flight training, and general aviation activities. It is named in honor of Carlos Rovirosa Pérez, a pioneer of Mexican aviation, who was born in Villahermosa. The airport is operated by Grupo Aeroportuario del Sureste (ASUR). In 2021, the airport handled 1,214,190 passengers, and in 2022, it served 1,396,653 passengers, an increase of 15.03% according to ASUR.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">General Lucio Blanco International Airport</span> International airport in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico

Reynosa International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Reynosa); officially Aeropuerto Internacional General Lucio Blanco(General Lucio Blanco International Airport) (IATA: REX, ICAO: MMRX) is an international airport located in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico, near the Mexico–United States border. It serves the Metropolitan Area of Reynosa and the Reynosa–McAllen transborder agglomeration, facilitating multiple domestic destinations, cargo flights, flight training, and general aviation activities. The airport is the headquarters for Aerodavinci and is named after Lucio Blanco, a prominent figure of the Mexican Revolution. Operated by Grupo Aeroportuario Centro Norte, the airport handled 518,051 passengers in 2022 and 540,122 passengers in 2023.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ciudad Juárez International Airport</span> International airport in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Ciudad Juárez International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional Abraham González(Abraham González International Airport) is an international airport located in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, near the Mexico–United States border. It serves the Metropolitan Area of Ciudad Juárez and the El Paso-Juárez agglomeration. The airport serves multiple domestic destinations and also supports cargo flights, flight training, and general aviation activities. It is named after Abraham González, a former Governor of the State of Chihuahua.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Toluca International Airport</span> International airport in Toluca, Mexico

Toluca International Airport ; officially Aeropuerto Internacional Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos(Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos International Airport) is an international airport in Toluca, State of Mexico, Mexico. It handles both national and international air traffic for the Metropolitan area of Toluca and serves as a secondary airport for Greater Mexico City, alongside Felipe Angeles Airport. Historically serving as a hub for Volaris, Interjet, and Republicair, the airport is operated by Administradora Mexiquense del Aeropuerto Internacional de Toluca and is named after President Adolfo López Mateos.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tuxtla Gutiérrez International Airport</span> International airport in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico

Tuxtla Gutiérrez International Airport ; officially known as Aeropuerto Internacional Ángel Albino Corzo(Ángel Albino Corzo International Airport) is an international airport situated in the municipality of Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas. It serves air traffic for Tuxtla Gutiérrez and a significant part of the State of Chiapas, including San Cristóbal de las Casas and Comitán.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cross Border Xpress</span> Border crossing between Mexico and the U.S.

Cross Border Xpress (CBX), historically also called the Tijuana Cross-border Terminal and the Puerta de las Californias, is an airport terminal located in the Otay Mesa area of southern San Diego, California, United States, with an access bridge connecting it to the Tijuana International Airport in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. It opened on December 9, 2015. It makes Tijuana Airport a geographically binational airport. Unlike the binational airports serving the Swiss cities of Basel and Geneva, the CBX terminal is physically located in the United States but serves an airport whose main terminal and runways are in Mexico. A pedestrian bridge spans the United States–Mexico border and Via de la Juventud Oriente in Tijuana, connecting passenger terminals between the two countries. It was the creation of Ralph Nieders, who introduced the concept and infrastructure design in Mexico City in 1989 and San Diego in 1990. The structural scheme allows passengers originating in, and destined to the United States direct access to the Tijuana airport and equally gives Mexican and international carriers operating from the Tijuana airport direct access to the U.S. passenger market.

References

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