Tikchik River

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Tikchik River
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Location of the mouth of the Tikchik River in Alaska
Location
Country United States
State Alaska
Census Area Dillingham
Physical characteristics
SourceNishlik Lake
  location Kuskokwim Mountains, Wood-Tikchik State Park
  coordinates 60°26′26″N158°50′42″W / 60.44056°N 158.84500°W / 60.44056; -158.84500 [1]
  elevation1,025 ft (312 m) [2]
Mouth Tikchik Lake
  location
65 miles (105 km) north of Dillingham
  coordinates
59°59′00″N158°20′28″W / 59.98333°N 158.34111°W / 59.98333; -158.34111 Coordinates: 59°59′00″N158°20′28″W / 59.98333°N 158.34111°W / 59.98333; -158.34111 [1]
  elevation
305 ft (93 m) [1]
Length45 mi (72 km) [1]

The Tikchik River is a 45 miles (72 km) long stream in the U.S. state of Alaska. [1] Beginning at Nishlik Lake in the Kuskokwim Mountains, it flows southeast into Tikchik Lake, 65 miles (105 km) north of Dillingham. [1] Tikchik Lake empties into the Nuyakuk River, a tributary of the Nushagak River, which flows to Nushagak Bay, an arm of Bristol Bay. [3]

Water from Upnuk Lake flows about 10 miles (16 km) to join the river downstream of Nishlik Lake. [4] Both lakes and the river lie within Wood-Tikchik State Park, [4] at 1.6 million acres (6,500 km2) the largest state park in the United States. [5]

Alaska Fishing says the river "makes an exciting float...with some potentially good fishing...". [6] Boating dangers include overhanging vegetation and bears, which feed on salmon. The main game fish frequenting the Tikchik are Arctic grayling, char, and red salmon, as well as lake trout in the lakes. [6]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Tikchik River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. January 1, 2000. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. Derived by entering source coordinates in Google Earth.
  3. Alaska Atlas & Gazetteer (7th ed.). Yarmouth, Maine: DeLorme. 2010. pp. 48, 56–57, 131. ISBN   978-0-89933-289-5.
  4. 1 2 "Tikchik River Trail". Alaska Department of Natural Resources. 2007. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  5. "Wood-Tikchik State Park". Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  6. 1 2 Limeres, Rene; Pedersen, Gunnar; et al. (2005). Alaska Fishing: The Ultimate Angler's Guide (3rd ed.). Roseville, California: Publishers Design Group. p. 238. ISBN   1-929170-11-4.