Tiller, Norway

Last updated
Tiller Municipality
Tiller herred
Tilder herred  (historic name)
Norway Counties Sor-Trondelag Position.svg
NO 1661 Tiller.svg
Tiller within Sør-Trøndelag
Coordinates: 63°20′34″N10°25′34″E / 63.34278°N 10.42611°E / 63.34278; 10.42611
Country Norway
County Sør-Trøndelag
District Trondheim Region
Established1 Jan 1899
  Preceded by Klæbu Municipality
Disestablished1 Jan 1964
  Succeeded by Trondheim Municipality
Administrative centre Heimdal
Area
 (upon dissolution)
  Total24 km2 (9 sq mi)
Population
 (1964)
  Total3,595
  Density150/km2 (390/sq mi)
Demonym Tillerbygg [1]
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-1661 [2]

Tiller is a former municipality in the old Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. The 24-square-kilometre (9.3 sq mi) municipality of Tiller existed from 1899 until its dissolution in 1964. The municipality encompassed part of the south-central part of what is now the municipality of Trondheim in Trøndelag county. The municipality was generally located between the river Nidelva in the east and the Dovrebanen railway line. The administrative centre was located at Heimdal, on the western edge of the municipality. The local Tiller Church was built shortly after the creation of the municipality (1901) to serve its residents. [3]

Contents

History

Tiller Church Tiller kirke.jpg
Tiller Church

The municipality of Tiller was established on 1 January 1899 when the northwestern part of the municipality of Klæbu was split off to form a separate municipality. Initially, Tiller had a population of 533. [4]

During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, the neighboring municipalities of Byneset (population: 2,049), Leinstrand (population: 4,193), Strinda (population: 44,600), Tiller (population: 3,595), and the city of Trondheim (population: 56,982) were merged to form the new urban municipality of Trondheim which would have a total population of 111,419. [4]

Name

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Tilder farm (Old Norse : Tildrar) since the first Tiller Church was built there. The name is the plural form of the word tildr which was probably the old name for a local river that flows into the large river Nidelva. The meaning of the name is uncertain. [5] Historically, the name of the municipality was spelled Tilder. On 3 November 1917, a royal resolution changed the spelling of the name of the municipality to Tiller. [6]

Government

While it existed, this municipality was responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment, social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. During its existence, this municipality was governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elected a mayor. [7]

Mayors

The mayors of Tiller: [8] [9] [10]

  • 1899–1904: Sivert Thonstad (H)
  • 1905–1910: Arnt Solberg (V)
  • 1911–1913: Johan Tiller (LL)
  • 1914–1916: Arnt Solberg (V)
  • 1917–1919: Johan Tiller (LL)
  • 1920–1922: Mentz Skjetne (Ap)
  • 1923–1924: Alf Godager (LL)
  • 1924–1928: John Thonstad (LL)
  • 1928–1928: Carl Schjetnan (Ap)
  • 1929–1931: Eyvind Løkken (V)
  • 1932–1932: Gjerlov Thonstad (Ap)
  • 1932–1933: Johan Tiller (LL)
  • 1935–1937: Eyvind Løkken (V)
  • 1938–1941: Arne Solberg (LL)
  • 1941–1945: Harald Hansen (NS)
  • 1945–1945: Arne Solberg (LL)
  • 1945–1945: John Bjørgum (Ap)
  • 1946–1947: Martin L. Kregnes (V)
  • 1948–1963: Gjerlov Thonstad (Ap)
  • 1963–1963: Bernhard Gylland (Ap)

Municipal council

The municipal council (Herredsstyre) of Tiller was made up of 19 representatives that were elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the final municipal council was as follows:

Tiller herredsstyre 19601963 [11]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
  Conservative Party (Høyre)2
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:19
Tiller herredsstyre 19561959 [12]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
Total number of members:19
Tiller herredsstyre 19521955 [13]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre) and the Farmers' Party  (Bondepartiet)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
Total number of members:16
Tiller herredsstyre 19481951 [14]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:12
Tiller herredsstyre 19451947 [15]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:12
Tiller herredsstyre 19381941* [16]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)6
Total number of members:12
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

See also

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