Tillite Glacier

Last updated

Tillite Glacier ( 83°51′S166°0′E / 83.850°S 166.000°E / -83.850; 166.000 Coordinates: 83°51′S166°0′E / 83.850°S 166.000°E / -83.850; 166.000 ) is a tributary glacier flowing northwest from Pagoda Peak in Queen Alexandra Range to join Lennox-King Glacier north of Fairchild Peak. So named by New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1961–62) because it contains outcrops of ancient moraine (tillite), indicative of glacial action in remote Paleozoic times.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Glacier Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

A glacier is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Pagoda Peak is a sharp peak, 3,040 m, between the heads of Tillite and Montgomerie Glaciers, 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of Mount Mackellar in Queen Alexandra Range. So named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1961–62) because of its shape.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tillite Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Lennox-King Glacier is a large valley glacier, about 40 nautical miles (70 km) long, draining Bowden Névé and flowing northeast between the Holland Range and the Queen Alexandra Range of Antarctica to enter Richards Inlet, Ross Ice Shelf. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1959–60) for Lieutenant Commander James Lennox-King, Royal New Zealand Navy, leader at Scott Base, 1960.

Alice Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Alice Glacier is a 13-nautical-mile (24 km) long tributary glacier in East Antarctica. It flows east from the Queen Alexandra Range to enter Beardmore Glacier at Sirohi Point. It was discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, under Ernest Shackleton, and was named for the mother of Eric Marshall, a member of Shackleton's South Polar Party.

Baronick Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Baronick Glacier is a glacier 6 nautical miles (11 km) southwest of Mount Cocks, in the Royal Society Range, draining into the Skelton Glacier to the west. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1963 for Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Michael P. Baronick, of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, who wintered at Williams Air Operating Facility at McMurdo Sound in 1956 and was in Antarctica for several summer seasons. Baronick, with a party of three, was in command of the Beardmore Air Operating Facility established on October 28, 1956, at 84°56′S 166°0′W.

Bates Glacier glacier in Antarctica


Bates Glacier is a small tributary glacier flowing north from the west side of Mount Queensland, and entering the west side of Campbell Glacier just north of Mills Peak, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the Northern Party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1965–66, for D.R. Bates, field assistant with that party.

Baxter Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Baxter Glacier is a glacier nurtured by icefalls from Flight Deck Neve, flowing northeast between Flagship Mountain and Mount Davidson to enter Fry Glacier, in Convoy Range, Victoria Land. It was named by a 1976–77 Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE) field party after James K. Baxter, New Zealand poet and social critic.

Bracken Peak

Bracken Peak is a peak, 1,240 metres (4,070 ft) high, standing in Sostra Heights south of the terminus of Newcomer Glacier and 3 miles (5 km) northeast of Mount Malone, on the east side of the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It surmounts Anchialus Glacier to the west and Vit Ice Piedmont to the east.

Carey Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Carey Glacier is a glacier on the east side of Miller and Fruzhin Peaks and west of Ruset and Malkoch Peaks in Petvar Heights at the southeast end of the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains, flowing southeast to Minnesota Glacier. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1957–59, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant David W. Carey, pilot with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, who was killed in the crash of a P2V Neptune airplane at McMurdo Sound in October 1956.

Portal Rock is a turret-like rock knob in Queen Alexandra Range, standing 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) northwest of Fairchild Peak, just south of the mouth of Tillite Glacier. So named by the Ohio State University geology party (1966–67) because the only safe route to Tillite Glacier lies between this rock and Fairchild Peak.

Peneplain Peak is a peak located midway along Hampton Ridge, which lies between Montgomerie Glacier and Mackellar Glacier in Queen Alexandra Range. So named by the Ohio State University Geological Party, 1967–68, because an excellent exposure of the "Kukri Peneplain," an ancient erosion surface, is present on the peak.

Evans Glacier is a tributary glacier just south of the Owen Hills, flowing east from the Queen Alexandra Range into Beardmore Glacier. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1961–62) for Petty Officer Edgar Evans, a member of Scott's South Pole Party of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, who died near here.

Fairchild Peak is a conspicuous rock peak, 2,180 metres (7,150 ft) high, standing 1.6 nautical miles (3 km) south-southeast of Portal Rock, at the south side of the mouth of Tillite Glacier. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William W. Fairchild, a United States Antarctic Research Program cosmic ray scientist at McMurdo Sound, 1961.

Montgomerie Glacier is a narrow tributary glacier, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, flowing north along the west side of Hampton Ridge in the Queen Alexandra Range of Antarctica to enter Lennox-King Glacier. It was named by the Northern Party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition of 1961–62 for John Montgomerie, assistant surveyor of that party.

HÃ¥lisen Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hålisen Glacier is a cirque glacier between Halisrimen Peak and Halisstonga Peak in the Kurze Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Hålisen.

The Holland Range is a rugged coastal mountain range in Antarctica, about 60 nautical miles (110 km) long, lying just west of the Ross Ice Shelf and extending from Robb Glacier to Lennox-King Glacier. It was named by the Ross Sea Committee for Sir Sidney Holland, who as Prime Minister of New Zealand supported that nation's participation in the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58).

Threshold Nunatak is an isolated nunatak located at the mouth of Tillite Glacier, 5 nautical miles (9 km) northeast of Portal Rock, in Queen Alexandra Range. The name was suggested by John Gunner of the Ohio State University Geological Expedition, 1969–70, who was landed by helicopter to collect a rock sample here. The name is in association with Portal Rock and also reflects the location at the mouth of Tillite Glacier.

Lashly Glacier is a short, broad glacier in Oates Land, Antarctica, lying between the Lashly Mountains on the west and Tabular Mountain and Mount Feather on the east, flowing south into The Portal, in Victoria Land. It was so named by the New Zealand party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58) for its proximity to the Lashly Mountains.

Leigh Hunt Glacier is a glacier in Antarctica, 7 nautical miles (13 km) long, flowing north-northwest to enter Brandau Glacier just west of Hare Peak. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1961–62) for A. Leigh Hunt, founder and first chairman of the New Zealand Antarctic Society.

Zapol Glacier

Zapol Glacier is a steep valley glacier draining the west slope of Vinson Massif south of Silverstein Peak and Príncipe de Asturias Peak, and descending between Tulaczyk Glacier and Donnellan Glacier in the Sentinel Range, Antarctica. The glacier flows southwestward and leaving the range joins Nimitz Glacier south of Hodges Knoll.

Black Cap is a prominent black rock peak which surmounts the northwest end of Teall Island, just south of the mouth of Skelton Glacier in Antarctica. It was sighted and given this descriptive name in February 1957 by the New Zealand party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956-58).