Tillmans Corner, Alabama

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Tillmans Corner, Alabama
Mobile County Alabama Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Tillmans Corner Highlighted.svg
Location in Mobile County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates: 30°35′20″N88°11′52″W / 30.58889°N 88.19778°W / 30.58889; -88.19778
Country United States
State Alabama
County Mobile
Area
  Total13.03 sq mi (33.75 km2)
  Land12.99 sq mi (33.65 km2)
  Water0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation
82 ft (25 m)
Population
 (2020) [1]
  Total17,731
  Density1,364.87/sq mi (527.00/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
36582 (Theodore)
36619 (Mobile)
FIPS code 01-76320
GNIS feature ID0127943

Tillmans Corner, or Tillman’s Corner, is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Mobile County, Alabama, United States. At the 2020 census, the population was 17,731. [1] It is part of the Mobile metropolitan area, and is the largest census-designated place in Alabama.

Contents

Geography

Tillmans Corner is located in southern Mobile County at 30°35′0″N88°11′52″W / 30.58333°N 88.19778°W / 30.58333; -88.19778 (30.583293, -88.197876). [2] It is bordered to the northeast by the city of Mobile and to the southeast by Theodore. Interstate 10 forms the border between Tillmans Corner and Theodore, with access from Exit 13 (Theodore Dawes Road). I-10 leads northeast 14 miles (23 km) to Downtown Mobile and west 27 miles (43 km) to Pascagoula, Mississippi.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Tillmans Corner CDP has a total area of 13.0 square miles (34 km2), of which 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2), or 0.30%, are water. [3]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1980 15,941
1990 17,98812.8%
2000 15,685−12.8%
2010 17,39810.9%
2020 17,7311.9%
source: [4]

2000 census

As of the census [5] of 2000, there were 15,685 people, 5,904 households, and 4,457 families residing in the community. The population density was 896.8 inhabitants per square mile (346.3/km2). There were 6,347 housing units at an average density of 362.9 per square mile (140.1/km2). The racial makeup of the community was 93.57% White, 3.16% Black or African American, 0.61% Native American, 0.94% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. 1.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,904 households, out of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.5% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the community, the population was spread out, with 25.9% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $34,309, and the median income for a family was $40,409. Males had a median income of $30,613 versus $21,637 for females. The per capita income for the community was $16,901. About 11.9% of families and 13.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.5% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census [6] of 2010, there were 17,398 people, 6,604 households, and 4,690 families residing in the community. The population density was 1,300 inhabitants per square mile (500/km2). There were 7,109 housing units at an average density of 546.8 per square mile (211.1/km2). The racial makeup of the community was 82.2% White, 11.4% Black or African American, 0.6% Native American, 2.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.6% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. 3.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,604 households, out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.0% were non-families. 24.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the community, the population was spread out, with 25.6% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 26.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.1 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $38,031, and the median income for a family was $44,784. Males had a median income of $38,617 versus $25,544 for females. The per capita income for the community was $18,291. About 18.4% of families and 20.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.2% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.

2020 census

Tillmans Corner racial composition [7]
RaceNum.Perc.
White (non-Hispanic)11,96067.45%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)3,19318.01%
Native American 960.54%
Asian 6473.65%
Pacific Islander 70.04%
Other/Mixed 9085.12%
Hispanic or Latino 9205.19%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 17,731 people, 6,400 households, and 4,384 families residing in the CDP.

Education

It is within the Mobile County Public School System. [8]

Sections of the current CDP are served by Nan Gray Davis, [9] Griggs, [10] Haskew, [11] and Meadowlake elementary schools. [12] Middle schools serving sections of Tillmans Corner include Hankins Middle School and Burns Middle School. [13] [14] Much of it is zoned to Theodore High School while a small portion is zoned to Davidson High School. [15] [16]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Tillmans Corner has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [17]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Tillmans Corner CDP, Alabama: 2020 DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171)". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved April 25, 2022.
  2. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  3. "CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING (1790-2000)". U.S. Census Bureau . Retrieved August 8, 2010.
  4. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  6. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  7. "2010 CENSUS - CENSUS BLOCK MAP (INDEX): Tillmans Corner CDP, AL." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on November 28, 2018. Pages: 1, 2, 3. - Previously it was larger: 2000 Census Map (see index) has it on pages 37 and 42, and the 1990 census map (index) has it on pages 37 and 42
  8. "Nan Gray Davis Elementary." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  9. "Griggs." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  10. "Haskew." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  11. "Meadowlake." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  12. "Hankins." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  13. "Burns Middle." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  14. "Theodore Archived 2017-05-16 at the Wayback Machine ." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  15. "Davidson." Mobile County Public School System. Retrieved on November 28, 2018.
  16. Climate Summary for Tillmans Corner, Alabama