Tilloker

Last updated
Tilokar تِلوكر
Village and union council
Country Pakistan
Region Punjab Province
District Khushab District
Time zone PST (UTC+5)

Tilokar (Urdu : تِلوكر), is a village and one of the 51 Union Councils (administrative subdivisions) of Khushab District in the Punjab Province of Pakistan. [1]

Khushab District District in Punjab, Pakistan

Khushab District is a district in the province of Punjab, Pakistan, with its administrative capital in Jauharabad. The district is named after the historical city of Khushab located within its boundaries. According to the 1998 census, the population was 905,711 with 24.76% living in urban areas. The district consists of four tehsils, Khushab, Noorpur Thal, Quaidabad and Naushera. Khushab is home to the Heavy Water and Natural Uranium Research Reactor, part of the Pakistan's Special Weapons Program.

Pakistan federal parliamentary constitutional republic in South Asia

Pakistan, officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, is a country in South Asia. It is the world’s sixth-most populous country with a population exceeding 212,742,631 people. In area, it is the 33rd-largest country, spanning 881,913 square kilometres. Pakistan has a 1,046-kilometre (650-mile) coastline along the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman in the south and is bordered by India to the east, Afghanistan to the west, Iran to the southwest, and China in the far northeast. It is separated narrowly from Tajikistan by Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor in the northwest, and also shares a maritime border with Oman.

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|death_place = Rawalpindi, Punjab, Pakistan |restingplace = Bhutto family mausoleum, Garhi Khuda Bakhsh, Sindh |nationality = British Indian (1928–1947)
Pakistani (1947–1979)

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The administrative units of Pakistan consist of four provinces, two autonomous territories and one federal territory. Each province and territory is subdivided into divisions, which are further subdivided into districts, which are further subdivided into tehsils, or taluka, which are further subdivided into union councils.

Prime Minister of Pakistan position

The Prime Minister of Pakistan is the head of government of Pakistan and designated as the "chief executive of the Republic".

Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 military confrontation between India and Pakistan alongside the Bangladesh Liberation War

The Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 was a military confrontation between India and Pakistan that occurred during the liberation war in East Pakistan from 3 December 1971 to the fall of Dacca (Dhaka) on 16 December 1971. The war began with preemptive aerial strikes on 11 Indian air stations, which led to the commencement of hostilities with Pakistan and Indian entry into the war of independence in East Pakistan on the side of Bengali nationalist forces. Lasting just 13 days, it is one of the shortest wars in history.

Districts of Pakistan administrative division used in Pakistan

The Districts of Pakistan, are the third-order administrative divisions of Pakistan, below provinces and divisions, but form the first-tier of local government. In total, there are 154 districts in Pakistan.

Bangladesh Liberation War Conflict that led to the independence of the majority-Bengali country

The Bangladesh Liberation War, also known as the Bangladesh War of Independence, or simply the Liberation War in Bangladesh, was a revolution and armed conflict sparked by the rise of the Bengali nationalist and self-determination movement in what was then East Pakistan during the 1971 Bangladesh genocide. It resulted in the independence of the People's Republic of Bangladesh. The war began after the Pakistani military junta based in West Pakistan launched Operation Searchlight against the people of East Pakistan on the night of 25 March 1971. It pursued the systematic elimination of nationalist Bengali civilians, students, intelligentsia, religious minorities and armed personnel. The junta annulled the results of the 1970 elections and arrested Prime minister-designate Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. The war ended on 16 December 1971 after West Pakistan surrendered.

Simla Agreement peace treaty

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Kargil War undeclared war between India and Pakistan

The Kargil War, also known as the Kargil conflict, was an armed conflict between India and Pakistan that took place between May and July 1999 in the Kargil district of Kashmir and elsewhere along the Line of Control (LOC). In India, the conflict is also referred to as Operation Vijay which was the name of the Indian operation to clear the Kargil sector.

Government of Pakistan National government

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Kashmir conflict conflict

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India–Pakistan relations Often acrimonious bilateral relations in South Asia

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Pakistan has long been accused by its neighbours India and Afghanistan, and western nations like the United States and the United Kingdom of its involvement in terrorist activities in the region and beyond. Pakistan's tribal region along its border with Afghanistan has been claimed to be a "haven for terrorists" by western media and the United States Defense Secretary. According to an analysis published by the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings Institution in 2008, Pakistan was, "with the possible exception of Iran, perhaps the world’s most active sponsor of terrorist groups... aiding groups that pose a direct threat to the United States." Daniel Byman, an author, also wrote that, "Pakistan is probably 2008's most active sponsor of terrorism".

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