Tilly Walker

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  1. 1 2 Walker sometimes gave his birthplace as Denver, Colorado, and his date of birth as October 8, 1880. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Tillie Walker Statistics and History. Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 6, 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Sheridan, J. B. (June 29, 1914). "Walker's pride made him great; he resented release by Griffith". Evening Independent . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 Brooks, James (2006). Limestone. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 38–39. ISBN   0738543004 . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  4. Biennial Report of the State Superintendent of Instruction of Tennessee. Nashville: Press of Brandon Printing Company. 1915. p. 30. Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  5. Brooks, James (2006). Limestone. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 98–99. ISBN   0738543004 . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "Tillie Walker Minor League Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved June 6, 2015.
  7. "Walker's failure Shanks' chance". The Daily Times . December 26, 1923. Retrieved June 6, 2015.
  8. King, Nelson J. (September 2009). Happiness Is Like a Cur Dog: The Thirty-Year Journey of a Major League Baseball Pitcher and Broadcaster. AuthorHouse. pp. 105–108. ISBN   978-1-4490-2548-9 . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  9. Brown, Norman (June 29, 1925). "Tillie never played there". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved June 6, 2015.
  10. Whalen, Thomas J. (April 16, 2011). When the Red Sox Ruled: Baseball's First Dynasty, 1912–1918. Government Institutes. pp. 111–112. ISBN   978-1-56663-902-6 . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  11. "1919 American League Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  12. 1 2 McNeil, William (1997). The King of Swat: An Analysis of Baseball's Home Run Hitters from the Major, Minor, Negro, and Japanese Leagues . McFarland & Company. pp.  39–41. ISBN   0786403624 . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  13. "1922 American League Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  14. "Walker of Philadelphia Athletics hit over one hundred home runs". Quebec Daily Telegraph. July 26, 1922. Retrieved 7 June 2015.
  15. "Tillie Walker is dropped by Mack". Evening Independent . December 22, 1923. Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  16. "TSN Umpire Card: Tilly Walker". Retrosheet . Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  17. Hayes, Tim (July 20, 2008). "Local legends in the pros: Bristol resident remembers Tilly Walker". Bristol Herald Courier . Retrieved June 7, 2015.
  18. Batesel, Paul (February 14, 2007). Major League Baseball Players of 1916: A Biographical Dictionary. McFarland. p. 154. ISBN   978-0-7864-2782-6 . Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  19. "Tilly Walker, ex-player, dies". The Pittsburgh Press . September 22, 1959. Retrieved June 6, 2015.
Tilly Walker
1916 Tilly Walker.jpeg
Outfielder
Born:(1887-09-04)September 4, 1887
Telford, Tennessee, U.S.
Died: September 21, 1959(1959-09-21) (aged 72)
Unicoi, Tennessee, U.S.
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 10, 1911, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
October 6, 1923, for the Philadelphia Athletics